Representing God : Christian Legal Activism in Contemporary England (eBook, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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Representing God : Christian Legal Activism in Contemporary England

Author: Meadhbh McIvor; Project Muse.
Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, Baltimore, Md. : Project MUSE, 2020. 0000 ©2020
Series: Book collections on Project MUSE.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Over the past two decades, increasing numbers of Britons possessing Christian views and beliefs have taken to the courts to enforce what are framed as "religious rights" under both European and domestic legislation. These cases typically involve Christians who have been penalized for seeking faith-based exemptions from their conditions of employment - e.g. Christian registrars who claim a conscientious objection to  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
McIvor, Méadhbh
Representing God : Christian Legal Activism in Contemporary England
Princeton : Princeton University Press,c2020
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Meadhbh McIvor; Project Muse.
ISBN: 0691211612 9780691211619
OCLC Number: 1183730482
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Frontmatter --
Contents --
Acknowledgements --
Introduction: Palm Fronds in the Public Square --
Chapter one. Confronting a Hostile World --
Chapter two. Grace and Law --
Chapter three. Broken Cisterns --
Chapter four. Getting Rights 'Right' --
Chapter five. Communicative Doubt --
Conclusion: Good Things Worth Sharing? --
Notes --
Bibliography --
Index
Series Title: Book collections on Project MUSE.
Responsibility: Meadhbh McIvor.
More information:

Abstract:

"Over the past two decades, increasing numbers of Britons possessing Christian views and beliefs have taken to the courts to enforce what are framed as "religious rights" under both European and domestic legislation. These cases typically involve Christians who have been penalized for seeking faith-based exemptions from their conditions of employment - e.g. Christian registrars who claim a conscientious objection to registering the marriages or civil partnerships of same-sex couples, or employees who ask for exceptions to uniform policies that forbid the visible wearing of religious jewellery (crosses and crucifixes). Observers of American politics and culture will be familiar with the view that devout Christians are victims of secular intolerance. American right-wing evangelical groups have launched well-funded legal challenges to federal and state laws with a view to establishing opt-out or conscientious objection provisions of the sort noted above. (Some of these cases will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court soon.) The American connection to the English controversies is direct, as the legal activism of English lobby organizations such as the Christian Legal Centre (CLC) is inspired by American conservative legal strategies - and CLC also receives donations from American sources. (Although it should be noted that most of CLC's donor base is English.) This is an especially delicate matter in England - a country which maintains an established Church but which remains wary of those who "do God" in public. This book is an ethnographic investigation of this contemporary issue and is based on the author's two years of ethnographic research split between a conservative Christian lobby group (CLC) and a conservative evangelical church in London. The author reveals that evangelicals on the ground are deeply ambivalent about the impact of this "legal theology". Although some wholeheartedly support the legal battles waged by organizations like CLC and see them as essential for allowing them to discharge their missionary obligations, others are concerned about the possible negative consequences of using secular law as a vehicle for their faith and the potential damage such legal strategies might do to their efforts to spread the Gospel"--

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