Ritual warfare, temple networks, and the birth of the Chinese novel, 1200-1600. (Book, 2015) [WorldCat.org]
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Ritual warfare, temple networks, and the birth of the Chinese novel, 1200-1600.

Author: Mark R E Meulenbeld
Publisher: Honolulu : University of Hawaii Press 2015.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English
Summary:
This innovative work seriously challenges the boundaries that are commonly drawn between such fields of inquiry as Chinese literature, Daoist ritual, and late imperial Chinese society and political history. Mark Meulenbeld steers scholarly awareness in a different direction by revealing the fundamental continuities that ex-ist between vernacular fiction, on the one hand, and exorcist, martial rituals in the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mark R E Meulenbeld
ISBN: 9780824838447 0824838440
OCLC Number: 893409229
Description: 349 pages
Responsibility: Mark R.E. Meulenbeld.

Abstract:

This innovative work seriously challenges the boundaries that are commonly drawn between such fields of inquiry as Chinese literature, Daoist ritual, and late imperial Chinese society and political history. Mark Meulenbeld steers scholarly awareness in a different direction by revealing the fundamental continuities that ex-ist between vernacular fiction, on the one hand, and exorcist, martial rituals in the vernacular language, on the other. This unusual book is a thorough interdisciplinary study that establishes once and for all the importance of understanding the idealizedrealities of literary texts within the larger context of cultural practices and socio-political history. While almost no terrain is left uncovered, of special importance is the ongoing dialogue with religious ideology that informs all these different discourses. The author makes a convincing case for the need to debunk the retrospective misconstrual of China as revolving around the same secularized cultural categories used in modern, Western academia, mostnotably literature, society, and politics."

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