A room of one's own (Book, 1929) [WorldCat.org]
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A room of one's own

Author: Virginia Woolf; Vanessa Bell; Leonard Woolf; R & R Clark (Firm); Hogarth Press,
Publisher: London : Published by Leonard and Virginia Woolf at the Hogarth Press, 52, Tavistock Square, Edinburgh [United Kingdom] : R. & R. Clark, Limited, 1929. [1929] ©1929
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Presented originally as two speeches to the Arts Society at Newham in 1928, this work is remarkable for its distinctive tone, for Woolf´s witty and deceptively casual style, and for her decision to largely eschew abstract arguments in favor of narrative, anecdote and the guidance of a strong, abiding first person narrator. She also, refreshingly, avoids doctrine and bombast, instead infusing her arguments with  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Virginia Woolf; Vanessa Bell; Leonard Woolf; R & R Clark (Firm); Hogarth Press,
ISBN: 0701202750 9780701202750
OCLC Number: 1697497
Notes: Dust jacket designed by Vanessa Bell.
"Printed in Great Britain by R. & R. Clark, Limited, Edinburgh"--Title page verso.
Description: 172 pages ; 19 cm
Responsibility: by Virginia Woolf.

Abstract:

Presented originally as two speeches to the Arts Society at Newham in 1928, this work is remarkable for its distinctive tone, for Woolf´s witty and deceptively casual style, and for her decision to largely eschew abstract arguments in favor of narrative, anecdote and the guidance of a strong, abiding first person narrator. She also, refreshingly, avoids doctrine and bombast, instead infusing her arguments with subtlety, curiosity and open-minded speculation. In addressing the question of women and fiction, the author explores the lack of equal opportunity for women by describibg a tour of Oxbridge, a mythical English university, and the obstacles to education a woman encounters there, concluding that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction".

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