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Saving the planet by design : reinventing our world through ecomimesis

Author: Ken Yeang
Publisher: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge, 2020. ©2020
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Can we 'save the Planet'? For a resilient, durable and sustainable future for human society, we need to repurpose, reinvent, redesign, remake and recover our human-made world so that our built environment is benignly and seamlessly biointegrated with Nature to function synergistically with it. These are the multiple tasks that humanity must carry out imminently if there is to be a future for human society and all  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ken Yeang
ISBN: 9780415685832 0415685834 9780415685818 0415685818
OCLC Number: 1100452582
Description: xvi, 195 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: 1. Reinventing the human-made world to address the sustainability equation. Proposition --
Achieving effective biointegration --
'Saving the Planet' as Ecological Design --
Designing and working within Nature's limits of resilience --
Destruction, displacement and fragmentation of natural habitats --
Misuse of the Planet as an environmental sink --
Degrading Nature's 'library of life' irreversibly --
Over-extraction of the Planet's natural resources --
Consequences of continued reduction of Nature's provision of ecosystem services --
Placing priority on Nature's infrastructure as 'ecocentricity' --
Working within Nature's thresholds of biocapacity and resilience --
Adopting the science of ecology as the basis for action: the principle of 'ecocentricity' --
Remaking the built environment to be in symbiosis with Nature --
Remaking existing cities, conurbations and urban areas --
Remaking the built environment as a 'constructed hybrid living ecosystem': the idea of 'ecomimesis' --
Addressing the 'sustainability equation' --
Being ecologically effective --
'Ecotopia' as human society's idealised vision of its future --
Addressing the environmental problems we have created? --
Further reading --
2. Redefining design to include the ecological sciences : The principle of ecocentricity. Defining Ecological Design: the principle of ecocentricity --
Defining design and its process --
The technocentric approach and its shortcomings --
The anthropocentric approach: addressing societal needs and values, biophilia and human well-being --
Ecological Design as applied ecology --
Addressing the issue of aesthetics in Ecological Design --
Local informants of Ecological Design --
Ecological Design's role in securing net positive environmental gain --
Implementing Ecological Design in an infrastructure-led approach --
Ecological Design and mobility --
Ecological Design and embodied impacts --
Ecological Design is not static - constant environmental monitoring, evaluation and response --
Summary of key issues in Ecological Design --
3. Reinventing the built environment by 'ecomimicry'. The biomimicry approach in the reinvention of the human-made world --
Different definitions of ecosystems --
Ecomimicry as designing based on the ecosystem concept --
Identifying the key ecosystem attributes and functionalities to emulate and replicate --
Other ecosystem attributes --
A performance-based framework --
The creation of the built environment as multi-brid living systems --
Key principles in implementing ecomimesis --
Reinventing the built environment by 'ecomimicry' --
4. Ecological design as the biointegration of a set of 'infrastructures' : the 'quatrobrid' constructed ecosystem. An integrative framework for Ecological Design --
Rationale for an infrastructure-based approach to Ecological Design --
Physically and systemically integrating the set of infrastructure into a designed system --
Reconceptualising the Ecological Design process --
5. Nature-based infrastructure - Earth's 'life support system'. Nature-based infrastructure --
Nature-based infrastructure and 'green infrastructure' --
Nature-based infrastructure and ecosystem services --
Understanding and analysing ecosystem services provision --
Relooking at limiting parameters --
Designing Nature's infrastructure for optimal ecosystem services provision --
The need for scale --
The need fro ecosystem biodiversity --
Avoiding and addressing ecosystem fragmentation --
The need for use of all urban dimensions --
Augmentation of the built environment to provide ecosystem services --
Infrastructure design optimisation --
The role of Nature-based infrastructure in ecological design --
6. Hydrological infrastructure. Nature's hydrology regarded as an infrastructure --
Water on the Planet --
Water resource management --
Key goal: minimisation of potable water use --
Key ecological design goal: a properly functioning water cycle and water supply --
Key goal: eliminating pollution of groundwater and aquatic ecosystems --
Ecomimetic approach of catchment/watershed management --
Ecomimetic approach of sustainable drainage systems --
Examples of sustainable drainage systems --
Ecomimetic approach of rainwater harvesting --
Ecomimetic approach of upscaling urban S U D S to 'sponge urbanism' --
Ecomimetic approach of incorporating greywater recycling --
Ecomimetic approach of recycling or eliminating blackwater --
Technology in the management of ecomimetic hydrological infrastructure --
Encouraging positive anthropocentric participation --
Summary of hydrological infrastructure factors 7. Technological infrastructure. What is technological infrastructure? --
The multitude of artefacts in human society --
Problems with our largest artefact - the city --
Problems of a linear metabolism --
Problems with supply of materials used to make the technological infrastructure --
Problems with the flow of materials in the built environment - designing to 'close the cycle' --
Avoiding piecemeal and incremental approaches --
Harnessing the Fourth Industrial Revolution for environmental sustainability --
Real-time global environmental surveillance --
Remaking and reinventing the technological infrastructure --
8. Anthropocentric infrastructure. Human society and social-economic-political systems as infrastructure --
Anthropocentric infrastructure's control of other infrastructures --
Traditional economic approach with environmental issues externalised --
Linear versus circular economies --
Decoupling economic growth from ever-increasing resource use --
Decoupling economic growth from the use of harmful substances and materials --
Humanity to adopt a sustainable diet --
Designing for humanity's health, well-being and happiness --
Designing for social equity --
Addressing humanitarian issues --
Variations of 'sustainable economies' --
Problems with monetising natural capital and ecosystem services --
Human ideologies and ecocentricity --
The ideology of ecocentricity --
Transforming human ideology and ethics --
Ecological literacy --
The anthropocentric infrastructure --
9. Being 'at one' with nature. Our effects on Planet Earth --
Resolving the sustainability equation --
The ecocentric approach --
The ecomimetic approach --
The holistic biointegration of infrastructures and making built environments as 'quatrobrid' constructed ecosystems --
Human ideologies --
How do the ideas, principles and directives presented here impact our human society?
Responsibility: Ken Yeang.

Abstract:

Can we 'save the Planet'? For a resilient, durable and sustainable future for human society, we need to repurpose, reinvent, redesign, remake and recover our human-made world so that our built environment is benignly and seamlessly biointegrated with Nature to function synergistically with it. These are the multiple tasks that humanity must carry out imminently if there is to be a future for human society and all lifeforms and their environments on the Planet. Addressing this is the most compelling question for those whose daily work impacts on Nature, such as architects, engineers, landscape architects, town planners, environmental policy makers, builders and others, but it is a question that all of humanity needs to urgently address.Presented here are two key principles as the means to carry out these tasks - 'ecocentricity' being guided by the science of ecology, and 'ecomimesis' as designing and making the built environment including all artefacts based on the emulation and replication of the 'ecosystem' concept.Designing with ecology is contended here as the authentic approach to green design from which the next generation of green design will emerge, going beyond current use of accreditation systems. For those who subscribe to this principle, this is articulated here, showing how it can be implemented by design. Adopting these principles is fundamental in our endeavour to save our Planet Earth, and changes profoundly and in entirety the way we design, make, manage and operate our built environment.-back cover.

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"...Yeang's goal is to restore the broken link between human and natural systems. Biointegration makes architecture a "prosthetic" to nature. This aligns Yeang with the idea of ecological Read more...

 
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Our effects on Planet Earth -- Resolving the sustainability equation -- The ecocentric approach -- The ecomimetic approach -- The holistic biointegration of infrastructures and making built environments as \'quatrobrid\' constructed ecosystems -- Human ideologies -- How do the ideas, principles and directives presented here impact our human society?<\/span>\"@en<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Can we \'save the Planet\'? For a resilient, durable and sustainable future for human society, we need to repurpose, reinvent, redesign, remake and recover our human-made world so that our built environment is benignly and seamlessly biointegrated with Nature to function synergistically with it. These are the multiple tasks that humanity must carry out imminently if there is to be a future for human society and all lifeforms and their environments on the Planet. 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