"Scorned my nation" : a comparison of translations of The merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish (Book, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

"Scorned my nation" : a comparison of translations of The merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish

Author: Dror Abend-David
Publisher: New York : Peter Lang, ©2003.
Series: Comparative cultures and literatures, vol. 16.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
By comparing versions of Shakespeare's play in three languages, reveals changing social and political perspectives relating to Jews and stereotypes about them. The histories of the reception of "The Merchant of Venice" reveal continuing reciprocal relations among the three cultures. In Germany the center of the play shifted from Elizabethan romantic comedy to the character of the Jew, who became an important figure  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Abend-David, Dror, 1966-
"Scorned my nation".
New York : Peter Lang, ©2003
(OCoLC)606935338
Named Person: William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; Shylock, (Fictitious character); William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; Shylock, (Fictitious character); William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; Shylock, (Fictitious character); William Shakespeare
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Dror Abend-David
ISBN: 0820457981 9780820457987
OCLC Number: 48475622
Description: 247 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Ch. I. Shakespeare, Jews, and the Missing Link: German Translations and Adaptations of The Merchant of Venice --
Ch. II. A Love-Hate Relationship: German Tradition in Yiddish Translations and Adaptations of The Merchant of Venice --
Ch. III. Introverted and Extroverted Representations: Yiddish and Hebrew Representations of The Merchant of Venice and of Shylock's Character during and after the Second World War --
Epilogue: Shylock during the "Age of Reparations": The Merchant of Venice as a Symbol of Contemporary Relations between Germans, Israelis, and Diaspora Jews --
App. I.A Chronological List of Related Events, Performances, and Translations of The Merchant of Venice into German --
App. II. A Chronological List of Related Events, Performances, and Translations of The Merchant of Venice into Yiddish --
App. III. A Chronological List of Related Events, Performances, and Translations of The Merchant of Venice into Hebrew.
Series Title: Comparative cultures and literatures, vol. 16.
Responsibility: Dror Abend-David.

Abstract:

By comparing versions of Shakespeare's play in three languages, reveals changing social and political perspectives relating to Jews and stereotypes about them. The histories of the reception of "The Merchant of Venice" reveal continuing reciprocal relations among the three cultures. In Germany the center of the play shifted from Elizabethan romantic comedy to the character of the Jew, who became an important figure in a country involved in determining who was a German and who was an alien. The latter stereotype culminated in the Nazi image of the Jew. Both the Yiddish and Hebrew translations presented counter-images of the Jew, either as a moral foil to immoral Christians or in tragic or heroic opposition to antisemites. In postwar Germany the play has served as a point of departure for discussions about German-Jewish relations in general and the Holocaust in particular.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.