The second mountain : the quest for a moral life (eBook, 2019) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
The second mountain : the quest for a moral life Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The second mountain : the quest for a moral life

Author: David Brooks
Publisher: New York : Random House, [2019] ©2019
Edition/Format:   eBook : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Every so often, you meet people who radiate joy--who seem to know why they were put on this earth, who glow with a kind of inner light. Life, for these people, has often followed what we might think of as a two-mountain shape. They get out of school, they start a career, and they begin climbing the mountain they thought they were meant to climb. Their goals on this first mountain are the ones our culture endorses:  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Self-help publications
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David Brooks
ISBN: 9780812993264 0812993268
OCLC Number: 1156730716
Description: xxxiii, 346 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Part I. The two mountains --
Moral ecologies --
The Instagram life --
The insecure overachiever --
The valley --
The wilderness --
Heart and soul --
The committed life --
The second mountain --
The four commitments --
Part II. Vocation --
What vocation looks like --
The annunciation moment --
What mentors do --
Vampire problems --
Mastery --
Part III. Marriage --
The maximum marriage --
The stages of intimacy I --
The stages of intimacy II --
The marriage decision --
Marriage: the school you build together --
Part IV. Philosophy and faith --
Intellectual commitments --
Religious commitment --
A most unexpected turn of events --
Ramps and walls --
Part V. Community --
The stages of community building I --
The stages of community building II --
Conclusion: the relationalist manifesto.
Responsibility: David Brooks.

Abstract:

"Every so often, you meet people who radiate joy--who seem to know why they were put on this earth, who glow with a kind of inner light. Life, for these people, has often followed what we might think of as a two-mountain shape. They get out of school, they start a career, and they begin climbing the mountain they thought they were meant to climb. Their goals on this first mountain are the ones our culture endorses: to be a success, to make your mark, to experience personal happiness. But when they get to the top of that mountain, something happens. They look around and find the view ... unsatisfying. They realize: This wasn't my mountain after all. There's another, bigger mountain out there that is actually my mountain. And so they embark on a new journey. On the second mountain, life moves from self-centered to other-centered. They want the things that are truly worth wanting, not the things other people tell them to want. They embrace a life of interdependence, not independence. They surrender to a life of commitment. In [this book], David Brooks explores the four commitments that define a life of meaning and purpose: to a spouse and family, to a vocation, to a philosophy or faith, and to a community. Our personal fulfillment depends on how well we choose and execute these commitments. Brooks looks at a range of people who have lived joyous, committed lives, and who have embraced the necessity and beauty of dependence. He gathers their wisdom on how to choose a partner, how to pick a vocation, how to live out a philosophy, and how we can begin to integrate our commitments into one overriding purpose. In short, this book is meant to help us all lead more meaningful lives. But it's also a provocative social commentary. We live in a society, Brooks argues, that celebrates freedom, that tells us to be true to ourselves, at the expense of surrendering to a cause, rooting ourselves in a neighborhood, binding ourselves to others by social solidarity and love. We have taken individualism to the extreme--and in the process we have torn the social fabric in a thousand different ways. The path to repair is through making deeper commitments. In The Second Mountain, Brooks shows what can happen when we put commitment-making at the center of our lives."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.