Seeing Indians : a study of race, nation, and power in El Salvador (Book, 2005) [WorldCat.org]
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Seeing Indians : a study of race, nation, and power in El Salvador
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Seeing Indians : a study of race, nation, and power in El Salvador

Author: Virginia Tilley
Publisher: Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Since the 1930s, government claims and popular thought within El Salvador have held that the country no longer holds any Indian population. Seeing Indians explores why this claim has endured despite the existence of substantial indigenous communities within the country's territory. Drawing on history, anthropology, and archaeology, Virginia Tilley delves into the history of Salvadoran racial thought and  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Tilley, Virginia.
Seeing Indians.
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2005
(OCoLC)607754298
Online version:
Tilley, Virginia.
Seeing Indians.
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2005
(OCoLC)608476189
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Virginia Tilley
ISBN: 0826339255 9780826339256
OCLC Number: 61130792
Description: 297 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: Introduction : a conqueror's vision --
"There are no Indians in El Salvador" : indigeneity, the state, and power --
El Salvador's ethnic landscape/s --
"What is an Indian?" --
In the shadow of the Maya --
Remembering Cuscatlán --
From colonial rule to independence --
The Matanza : genocide, ethnocide--
auto-ethnocide? --
Assimilated or erased? : ethnocide by statistics --
Being mestizo : the twisted logics of mestizaje --
Celebrating Indians.
Responsibility: Virginia Q. Tilley.
More information:

Abstract:

"Since the 1930s, government claims and popular thought within El Salvador have held that the country no longer holds any Indian population. Seeing Indians explores why this claim has endured despite the existence of substantial indigenous communities within the country's territory. Drawing on history, anthropology, and archaeology, Virginia Tilley delves into the history of Salvadoran racial thought and nation-building to illuminate the political motives for eradicating Indians from the country's national consciousness." "Part I draws from the author's own ethnographic research in El Salvador and Guatemala to show how "Indian-ness" has persisted, in contested forms, within El Salvador. Part II traces how the Salvadoran definition of being Indian has been altered to fit within the country's desired image as a racially unified society - and to erase Indians from public records after 1932. The author explains in Part III the motives driving the myth of Indian disappearance and ends with a look at the debate that raged in the 1990s regarding El Salvador's indigenous peoples' attempts to express themselves politically."--Jacket.

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