Shakespeare's tragic skepticism (Audiobook on CD, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
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Shakespeare's tragic skepticism
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Shakespeare's tragic skepticism

Author: Millicent Bell
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : English
Summary:
Readers of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies have long noted the absence of readily explainable motivations for some of Shakespeare's greatest characters: Why does Hamlet delay his revenge for so long? Why does King Lear choose to renounce his power? Why is Othello so vulnerable to Iago's malice? But while many critics have chosen to overlook these omissions or explain them away, [the author of this book]  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Millicent Bell
OCLC Number: 52083175
Notes: Originally published: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2002.
Description: 1 audio disc ; 4 3/4 in.
Contents: Introduction: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth --
Hamlet, revenge!
Responsibility: Millicent Bell.

Abstract:

Readers of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies have long noted the absence of readily explainable motivations for some of Shakespeare's greatest characters: Why does Hamlet delay his revenge for so long? Why does King Lear choose to renounce his power? Why is Othello so vulnerable to Iago's malice? But while many critics have chosen to overlook these omissions or explain them away, [the author of this book] demonstrates that they are essential elements of Shakespeare's philosophy of doubt. Examining Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Julius Caesar, and Antony and Cleopatra, Millicent Bell reveals the persistent strain of philosophical skepticism that runs throughout Shakespeare's plays. Like his contemporary Montaigne, Shakespeare repeatedly calls attention to the essential unknowability of our world.-Dust jacket.

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