skip to content
The Signal Corps : the emergency (to December 1941) Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The Signal Corps : the emergency (to December 1941)

Author: Dulany Terrett
Publisher: Washington : Office of the Chief of Military History, Dept. of the Army, 1956.
Series: United States Army in World War II., Technical services.
Edition/Format:   Book : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Describes the Corps' responsibility for developing, procuring, and furnishing signal equipment. The development of radar is featured, as well as the development of frequency modulation and its impact on the use of tanks.
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Terrett, Dulany.
Signal Corps: the emergency (to December 1941)
Washington, Office of the Chief of Military History, Dept. of the Army, 1956
(OCoLC)570299984
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dulany Terrett
OCLC Number: 8990522
Description: xiii, 383 p. : ill., ports. ; 26 cm.
Series Title: United States Army in World War II., Technical services.
Responsibility: by Dulany Terrett.

Abstract:

Describes the Corps' responsibility for developing, procuring, and furnishing signal equipment. The development of radar is featured, as well as the development of frequency modulation and its impact on the use of tanks.

Notes:

by SiegfriedSchwertner (WorldCat user on 2007-10-25)

< During World War II the Signal Corps provided, as it had traditionally done, both strategic and tactical communications. As both a combat arm and a technical service, a status it shared only with the Corps of Engineers, it was responsible for the doctrine and equipment used by every Army communicator. Thanks to the technological advances of the 1920s and 1930s, electronic signals carried the voice of command from Washington to the most distant theater of operations. Although FM radio had been developed for tactical use by the eve of World War II, pigeons continued to roost within the Signal Corps' inventory. By 1945, despite instances of heroic service, especially in Italy, their days as Army communicators were numbered. These winged messengers, survivors of a simpler era, could not compete with such electronic battlefield devices as the walkie-talkie. The story of this communications revolution is contained in these three volumes. Advances in electronics, especially radar, were second in importance only to that of nuclear fission as an application of scientific knowledge to the fighting of a technological war. However, in the development of many other electronic devices, such as the proximity fuze, Signal Corps research efforts were also significant. Of the technical services, the Signal Corps was the least prepared in 1941 for what lay ahead. The War Department's prewar planning grossly underestimated the demands for communication that the kind of war in which the United States was about to engage would impose. The Emergency examines this planning. It sketches the growth of the corps from its birth in 1860 to the outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939 (Chs. I-III). The narrative establishes the breadth of the corps' mission and describes its organization, doctrine, and programs of research and development, since all of these deeply affected its activities in World War II. The emphasis of the volume is nonetheless placed on the events of the period from 1939 to December 1941 . Each of the main activities of the corps is treated: research and development; procurement, testing, and evaluation; the storage, distribution, and maintenance of devices and systems of communication; and the elaborate training programs needed to see that all of these activities were accomplished effectively. ...> - Analytical description from: US Army in WW II : Reader’s guide. – 1992. p.122

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/8990522>
library:oclcnum"8990522"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/8990522>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"United States. Army. Signal Corps"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:author
schema:datePublished"1956"
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/19169443>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The Signal Corps : the emergency (to December 1941)"
schema:numberOfPages"383"
schema:publisher
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Office of the Chief of Military History, Dept. of the Army"

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.