Social causes of psychological distress (eBook, 2017) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Social causes of psychological distress Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Social causes of psychological distress

Author: John Mirowsky; Catherine E Ross
Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] : Routledge, 2017.
Series: Social institutions and social change.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Summary:
"A core interest of social science is the study of stratification--inequalities in income, power, and prestige. Few persons would care about such inequalities if the poor, powerless, and despised were as happy and fulfilled as the wealthy, powerful, and admired. Social research often springs from humanistic empathy and concern as much as from scholarly and scientific curiosity. An economist might observe that black  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: John Mirowsky; Catherine E Ross
ISBN: 9781351490511 1351490516 9781351490504 1351490508
OCLC Number: 1028227728
Description: 1 online resource (320 pages)
Contents: pt. I. Introduction --
1. Introduction --
Understanding the connections between social and personal problems --
Preview --
pt. II. Researching the causes of distress --
2. Measuring psychological well-being and distress --
What is psychological distress? --
Diagnosis : superimposed distinctions --
Conclusion : the story of a woman diagnosed --
Appendix of symptom indexes --
3. Real-world causes of real-world misery --
Establishing cause in the human sciences --
Explaining real patterns --
pt. III. Social patterns of distress --
4. Basic patterns --
Community mental health surveys --
Socioeconomic status --
Marriage --
Children at home --
Gender --
Undesirable life events --
Age --
Discussion --
5. New patterns --
Life course disruptions and developments --
Neighborhood disadvantage and disorder --
pt. IV. Explaining the patterns --
6. Life change : an abandoned explanation --
Conceptual history of life change and stress --
Contradictory evidence --
Variants of the life change index --
Alternative concepts and future research --
7. Alienation --
Control --
Commitment --
Support --
Meaning --
Normality --
Alienation : the prime stressor --
8. Authoritarianism and inequity --
Authoritarianism --
Inequity --
pt. V. Conclusion --
9. Why some people are more distressed than others --
Control of one's own life --
The importance of social factors --
Genetics and biochemistry as alternative explanations --
What can be done? --
"Take arms against a sea of troubles" --
Appendix : description of data sets and measures --
Aging, Status, and the Sense of Control Survey --
Community, Crime, and Health Survey --
Illinois Survey of Well-Being --
Life Stress and Illness Project --
Women and Work Study --
Work, Family, and Well-Being Survey.
Series Title: Social institutions and social change.
Responsibility: John Mirowsky, Catherine E. Ross.

Abstract:

"A core interest of social science is the study of stratification--inequalities in income, power, and prestige. Few persons would care about such inequalities if the poor, powerless, and despised were as happy and fulfilled as the wealthy, powerful, and admired. Social research often springs from humanistic empathy and concern as much as from scholarly and scientific curiosity. An economist might observe that black Americans are disproportionately poor, and investigate racial differences in education, employment, and occupation that account for disproportionate poverty. A table comparing additional income blacks and whites can expect for each additional year of education is thus as interesting in its own right as any dinosaur bone or photo of Saturn. However, something more than curiosity underscores our interest in the table. Racial differences in status and income are a problem in the human sense. Inequality in misery makes social and economic inequality personally meaningful. There are two ways social scientists avoid advocacy in addressing issues of social stratification. The first way is to resist projecting personal beliefs, values, and responses as much as possible, while recognizing that the attempt is never fully successful. The second way is by giving the values of the subjects an expression in the research design. Typically, this takes the form of opinion or attitude surveys. Researchers ask respondents to rate the seriousness of crimes, the appropriateness of a punishment for a crime, the prestige of occupations, the fair pay for a job, or the largest amount of money a family can earn and not be poor, and so on. The aggregate judgments, and variations in judgments, represent the values of the subjects and not those of the researcher. They are objective facts with causes and consequences of interest in their own right. This work is an effort to move methodology closer to human concerns without sacrificing the scientific grounds of research as such. The"--Provided by publisher.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.