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The social leap : the new evolutionary science of who we are, where we come from, and what makes us happy

Author: William von Hippel
Publisher: New York : Harper Wave, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2018] ©2018
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
In the compelling popular science tradition of Sapiens and Guns, Germs, and Steel, a groundbreaking and eye-opening exploration that applies evolutionary science to provide a new perspective on human psychology, revealing how major challenges from our past have shaped some of the most fundamental aspects of our being. The most fundamental aspects of our lives-from leadership and innovation to aggression and
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William von Hippel
ISBN: 9780062740397 0062740393
OCLC Number: 1061558540
Description: 291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Part I. How we became who we are --
Expelled from Eden --
Out of Africa --
Crops, cities, and kings --
Sexual selection and social comparison --
Part II. Leveraging the past to understand the present --
Homo socialis --
Homo innovatio --
Elephants and baboons --
Tribes and tribulations --
Part III. Using knowledge of the past to build a better future --
Why evolution gave us happiness --
Finding happiness in evolutionary imperatives --
Epilogue.
Responsibility: William von Hippel.

Abstract:

In the compelling popular science tradition of Sapiens and Guns, Germs, and Steel, a groundbreaking and eye-opening exploration that applies evolutionary science to provide a new perspective on human psychology, revealing how major challenges from our past have shaped some of the most fundamental aspects of our being. The most fundamental aspects of our lives-from leadership and innovation to aggression and happiness-were permanently altered by the "social leap" our ancestors made from the rainforest to the savannah. Their struggle to survive on the open grasslands required a shift from individualism to a new form of collectivism, which forever altered the way our mind works. It changed the way we fight and our proclivity to make peace, it changed the way we lead and the way we follow, it made us innovative but not inventive, it created a new kind of social intelligence, and it led to new sources of life satisfaction. In The Social Leap, William von Hippel lays out this revolutionary hypothesis, tracing human development through three critical evolutionary inflection points to explain how events in our distant past shape our lives today. From the mundane, such as why we exaggerate, to the surprising, such as why we believe our own lies and why fame and fortune are as likely to bring misery as happiness, the implications are far reaching and extraordinary. Blending anthropology, biology, history, and psychology with evolutionary science, The Social Leap is a fresh and provocative look at our species that provides new clues about who we are, what makes us happy, and how to use this knowledge to improve our lives.

Our ancestors' move from the rainforest to the open grasslands required a shift from individualism to a new form of collectivism, and altered the way our mind works. It changed the way we fight, the ways we lead and follow; it made us innovative but not inventive, and created a new kind of social intelligence. Hippel traces human development through three critical evolutionary inflection points to explain how events in our distant past shape our lives today. In doing so he provides new clues about who we are, what makes us happy, and how to use this knowledge to improve our lives. -- adapted from info provided

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"The Social Leap is a rollicking tour through humanity's evolutionary past, and William von Hippel is the consummate tour guide. With equal parts wisdom, humor, authority, and charm, von Hippel shows Read more...

 
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