Sorting things out : classification and its consequences (Book, 1999) [WorldCat.org]
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Sorting things out : classification and its consequences

Author: Geoffrey C Bowker; Susan Leigh Star
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 1999
Series: Inside technology
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
What do a 17th-century mortality table (whose causes of death include "fainted in a bath" "frighted" and "itch"); the identification of South Africans during apartheid as European Asian coloured or black; and the separation of machine- from hand-washables have in common? All are examples of classification - the scaffolding of information infrastructures.
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Geoffrey C Bowker; Susan Leigh Star
ISBN: 0262024616 9780262024617
OCLC Number: 460439847
Notes: Litteraturhenvisninger
Description: xii, 377 s. : illustrations
Contents: Indhold: Introduction : to classify is human --
Some tricks of the trade in analyzing classification --
The kindness of strangers : kinds and politics in classification systems --
The ICD as information infrastructure --
Classification, coding, and coordination --
Of tuberculosis and trajectories --
The case of race classification and reclassification under apartheid --
What a difference a name makes : the classification of nursing work --
Organisational forgetting, nursing knowledge, and classification --
Categorical work and boundary infrastructures : enriching theories of classification --
Why classifications matter
Series Title: Inside technology
Responsibility: Geoffrey C. Bowker ; Susan Leigh Star

Abstract:

What do a 17th-century mortality table (whose causes of death include "fainted in a bath" "frighted" and "itch"); the identification of South Africans during apartheid as European Asian coloured or black; and the separation of machine- from hand-washables have in common? All are examples of classification - the scaffolding of information infrastructures.

In "Sorting Things Out" Geoffrey C. Bowker and Susan Leigh Star explore the role of categories and standards in shaping the modern world. In a clear and lively style they investigate a variety of classification systems incuding the International Classification of Diseases the Nursing Interventions Classification race classification under apartheid in South Africa and the classification of viruses and tuberculosis.

The authors emphasize the role of "invisibility" in the process by which classification orders human interaction. They examine how categories are made and kept invisible and how people can change this invisibility when necessary. They also explore systems of classification as part of the built information environment. Much as an urban historian would review highway permits and zoning decisions to tell a city's story the authors review archives of classification design to understand how decisions have been made. "Sorting Things Out" has a moral agenda for each standard and category valorizes some point of view and silences another. Standards and classifications produce advantage or suffering. Jobs are made and lost; some regions benefit at the expense of others. How these choices are made and how we think about that process are at the moral and political core of this work. The book is an important empirical source for understanding the building of information infrastructures.

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