skip to content
Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

"Staying together": Kinship and community in Fiji.

Author: James West Turner; Michigan State University.
Dissertation: Ph. D. Michigan State University 1983
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Microfiche : EnglishView all editions and formats
Publication:Dissertation Abstracts International, 44-07A.
Summary:
This study examines the principles of organization which regulate the life of a Fijian village. The title is taken from the Fijian phrase tiko vata, translated here as "staying together." Discussion focuses on how social units whose members are regarded as people of different "types," who claim different origins, and who acknowledge different ancestral deities and totemic associations, nonetheless come to regard
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James West Turner; Michigan State University.
OCLC Number: 224267601
Notes: (UnM)AAI8324774.
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 44-07, Section: A, page: 2192.
Reproduction Notes: Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich : University Microfilms International.
Description: 398 pages

Abstract:

This study examines the principles of organization which regulate the life of a Fijian village. The title is taken from the Fijian phrase tiko vata, translated here as "staying together." Discussion focuses on how social units whose members are regarded as people of different "types," who claim different origins, and who acknowledge different ancestral deities and totemic associations, nonetheless come to regard themselves as a community. The bonds which unite them are shown to include mutual dependence on village lands; propinquity and the resultant coactivity; common allegiance to a chief; ritual interdependence; and ties of uterine kinship and marriage. In developing this general theme, individual chapters explore a variety of topics.

Among them are the use and distribution of land; the production, sharing, and exchange of food; rituals which renew the charter of the political order; the role of kava in ritual and recreational contexts; the web of kinship; and principles of hierarchy. All of these can be seen to be an integrating factor in community life, but they also define differences between individuals as members of a variety of groups and categories. Understanding the nature of these groups and categories is a principal concern of this study. This requires that we unravel the intertwined strands of propinquity and descent. Those who are united in one context may be differentiated in another, and it will be seen that the contexts in which boundaries are defined frequently involve exchange. The data on which this study is based were collected during seventeen months of fieldwork in a village in Naitasiri province in the mountainous interior of Vita Levu, the largest of the Fiji Islands.

Much of the information was acquired through participant observation of community life. Topics of interest first encountered in informal settings were then pursued through more structured interviews including household surveys and genealogical research. Oral accounts were combined with archival research to study such processes as chiefly succession.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/224267601> # "Staying together": Kinship and community in Fiji.
    a bgn:Microform, schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book, bgn:Thesis ;
   bgn:inSupportOf "" ;
   library:oclcnum "224267601" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/miu> ;
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4346278#Topic/anthropology_cultural> ; # Anthropology, Cultural
   schema:contributor <http://viaf.org/viaf/132674037> ; # Michigan State University.
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/1513778> ; # James West Turner
   schema:datePublished "1983" ;
   schema:description "Among them are the use and distribution of land; the production, sharing, and exchange of food; rituals which renew the charter of the political order; the role of kava in ritual and recreational contexts; the web of kinship; and principles of hierarchy. All of these can be seen to be an integrating factor in community life, but they also define differences between individuals as members of a variety of groups and categories. Understanding the nature of these groups and categories is a principal concern of this study. This requires that we unravel the intertwined strands of propinquity and descent. Those who are united in one context may be differentiated in another, and it will be seen that the contexts in which boundaries are defined frequently involve exchange. The data on which this study is based were collected during seventeen months of fieldwork in a village in Naitasiri province in the mountainous interior of Vita Levu, the largest of the Fiji Islands."@en ;
   schema:description "Much of the information was acquired through participant observation of community life. Topics of interest first encountered in informal settings were then pursued through more structured interviews including household surveys and genealogical research. Oral accounts were combined with archival research to study such processes as chiefly succession."@en ;
   schema:description "This study examines the principles of organization which regulate the life of a Fijian village. The title is taken from the Fijian phrase tiko vata, translated here as "staying together." Discussion focuses on how social units whose members are regarded as people of different "types," who claim different origins, and who acknowledge different ancestral deities and totemic associations, nonetheless come to regard themselves as a community. The bonds which unite them are shown to include mutual dependence on village lands; propinquity and the resultant coactivity; common allegiance to a chief; ritual interdependence; and ties of uterine kinship and marriage. In developing this general theme, individual chapters explore a variety of topics."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/4346278> ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name ""Staying together": Kinship and community in Fiji."@en ;
   schema:productID "224267601" ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/224267601> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4346278#Topic/anthropology_cultural> # Anthropology, Cultural
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Anthropology, Cultural"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/132674037> # Michigan State University.
    a schema:Organization ;
   schema:name "Michigan State University." ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/1513778> # James West Turner
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Turner" ;
   schema:givenName "James West" ;
   schema:name "James West Turner" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.