Structures of German "political theology" in the Nazi era (Book, 1979) [WorldCat.org]
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Structures of German "political theology" in the Nazi era

Author: Uriel Tal
Publisher: Tel-Aviv : Chaim Rosenberg School of Jewish Jewish Studies, Diaspora Research Institute, Tel-Aviv University, [1979]
Series: Annual lecture of the Jacob M. and Shoshana Schreiber Chair of Contemporary Jewish History, 2.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Highlights the way that theology lent a redemptive character to the "Führer" and the "Reich". A double process occurred: the sacralization of politics and the secularization of religion. Racism was central to the Nazi revolution, with racial antisemitism a central expression of the tension between rationality and irrationality. The Nazi substitute religion altered the basic meaning of the concepts of God and man,  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Tal, Uriel.
Structures of German "political theology" in the Nazi era.
Tel-Aviv : Chaim Rosenberg School of Jewish Jewish Studies, Diaspora Research Institute, Tel-Aviv University, [1979]
(OCoLC)644118533
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Uriel Tal
OCLC Number: 7040206
Notes: Second annual lecture of the Jacob M. and Shoshana Schreiber Chair of Contemporary Jewish History.
Description: 58 pages ; 21 cm.
Series Title: Annual lecture of the Jacob M. and Shoshana Schreiber Chair of Contemporary Jewish History, 2.
Responsibility: by Uriel Tal.

Abstract:

Highlights the way that theology lent a redemptive character to the "Führer" and the "Reich". A double process occurred: the sacralization of politics and the secularization of religion. Racism was central to the Nazi revolution, with racial antisemitism a central expression of the tension between rationality and irrationality. The Nazi substitute religion altered the basic meaning of the concepts of God and man, with metaphysics and eschatology being replaced by nationality and statehood, and redemption by loyalty and obedience to the state. Among both Protestants and Catholics, even the anti-Nazis among them, antisemitism was present, with Judaism and Nazism sometimes equated as dangers to Christianity. Nazi sacralization was achieved via language. Hatred was substituted for thought. There were changes and different emphases in the development of Nazi ideology and policy; one of the few aspects that were consistent was antisemitism.

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