Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology. (eBook, 2008) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology.

Author: Helen Mitchell; ProQuest (Firm)
Publisher: Oxford ; Ames, Iowa : Blackwell Pub., 2006.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Sugar replacement in food and beverage manufacture no longer has just an economic benefit. The use of ingredients to improve the nutritional status of a food product is now one of the major driving forces in new product development. It is therefore important, as options for sugar replacement continue to increase, that expert knowledge and information in this area is readily available. Sweeteners and Sugar  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version
Mitchell, Helen
Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology
Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2008
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Helen Mitchell; ProQuest (Firm)
ISBN: 9780470995990 0470995998
OCLC Number: 1097151860
Notes: 13.8.8 Over the counter products.
Description: 1 online resource (433 pages)
Contents: Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology --
Contents --
Preface --
Contributors --
PART ONE: NUTRITION AND HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS --
1 Glycaemic Responses and Toleration --
1.1 Introduction --
1.2 Glycaemic response in ancient times --
1.3 Glycaemic response approaching the millennium --
1.4 The Glycaemic response now and in future nutrition --
1.5 Measurement and expression of the glycaemic response --
1.6 The acute glycaemic response to sugars and sweeteners --
1.7 Long-term glycaemic control with sweeteners and bulking agents --
1.8 Gastrointestinal tolerance in relation to the glycaemic response --
1.9 Finally --
2 Dental Health --
2.1 Introduction --
2.2 Dental caries --
2.2.1 The problem --
2.2.2 Aetiology --
2.2.3 Control and prevention --
2.2.4 Determining cariogenicity --
2.3 Reduced calorie bulk sweeteners --
2.3.1 Erythritol --
2.3.2 Isomalt --
2.3.3 Lactitol --
2.3.4 Maltitol --
2.3.5 Sorbital --
2.3.6 Mannitol --
2.3.7 D-tagatose --
2.3.8 Xylitol --
2.3.9 Key points from the dental evidence for reducedcalorie sweeteners and their use --
2.4 High-potency (high-intensity) sweeteners --
2.4.1 Acesulfame K --
2.4.2 Aspartame and neotame --
2.4.3 Cyclamate and saccharin --
2.4.4 Sucralose --
2.4.5 Other sweeteners --
2.4.6 Key points from the dental evidence for high-potency (high-intensity) sweeteners and their use --
2.5 Bulking agents --
2.5.1 Polydextrose --
2.5.2 Fructose and glucose polymers --
2.5.3 Key points from the dental evidence for bulking agents --
2.6 Summary --
3 Digestive Health --
3.1 Introduction --
3.1.1 Prebiotics, sweeteners and digestive health --
3.1.2 Intestinal microbiota --
3.1.3 Gut health --
3.2 Prebiotics versus fibre --
3.2.1 Endogenous prebiotics --
3.2.2 Milk oligosaccharides --
3.2.3 Secreted substrates in the gut --
3.3 Prebiotics --
3.3.1 Current prebiotics --
3.4 Health benefits. 3.5 Synbiotics --
3.6 Safety considerations --
3.7 Conclusion --
4 Calorie Control and Weight Management --
4.1 Caloric contribution of sugars in our diet --
4.2 Calorie control and its importance in weight management --
4.3 Satiety: role of intense and bulk sweeteners --
4.4 Legislation relevant to reduced-calorie foods --
4.5 Conclusions --
PART TWO: HIGH-POTENCY (HIGH-INTENSITY) SWEETENERS --
5 Acesulfame K --
5.1 Introduction and history --
5.2 Organoleptic properties --
5.2.1 Acesulfame K as the single sweetener --
5.2.2 Blends of acesulfame K with other sweetening agents --
5.2.3 Compatibility with flavours --
5.3 Physical and chemical properties --
5.3.1 Appearance --
5.3.2 Solubility --
5.3.3 Stability --
5.4 Physiological properties --
5.5 Applications --
5.5.1 Beverages --
5.5.2 Dairy products and edible ices --
5.5.3 Bakery products and cereals --
5.5.4 Sweets and chewing gum --
5.5.5 Jams, marmalades, preserves and tinned fruit --
5.5.6 Delicatessen products --
5.5.7 Table-top sweeteners --
5.5.8 Pharmaceuticals --
5.5.9 Cosmetics --
5.5.10 Tobacco products --
5.5.11 Technical applications --
5.6 Safety and analytical methods --
5.6.1 Pharmacology --
5.6.2 Toxicology --
5.6.3 Safety assessments and acceptable daily intake --
5.6.4 Analytical methods --
5.7 Regulatory status --
5.7.1 Approvals --
5.7.2 Purity criteria --
6 Aspartame and Neotame --
6.1 Aspartame --
6.1.1 Synthesis --
6.1.2 Sensory properties --
6.1.3 Physicochemical properties --
6.1.4 Physiological properties --
6.1.5 Applications --
6.1.6 Analysis --
6.1.7 Safety --
6.1.8 Regulatory status --
6.2 Neotame --
6.2.1 Neotame structure and synthesis --
6.2.2 Sensory properties --
6.2.3 Physicochemical properties --
6.2.4 Physiological properties --
6.2.5 Applications --
6.2.6 Safety --
6.2.7 Regulatory --
7 Saccharin and Cyclamate --
7.1 Saccharin. 7.1.1 History, manufacture and chemical composition --
7.1.2 Organoleptic properties --
7.1.3 Physical and chemical properties --
7.1.4 Physiological properties --
7.1.5 Applications --
7.1.6 Safety --
7.1.7 Regulatory status --
7.2 Cyclamate --
7.2.1 History, manufacture and chemical composition --
7.2.2 Organoleptic properties --
7.2.3 Physical and chemical properties --
7.2.4 Physiological properties --
7.2.5 Applications --
7.2.6 Safety --
7.2.7 Regulatory status --
8 Sucralose --
8.1 Introduction --
8.2 History of development --
8.3 Production --
8.4 Organoleptic properties --
8.5 Physico-chemical properties --
8.6 Physiological properties --
8.7 Applications --
8.7.1 Beverages --
8.7.2 Dairy products --
8.7.3 Confectionery --
8.7.4 Baked products --
8.7.5 Pharmaceuticals --
8.8 Analytical methods --
8.9 Safety --
8.10 Regulatory situation --
Summary Table for Part Two --
PART THREE: REDUCED-CALORIE BULK SWEETENERS --
9 Erythritol --
9.1 Description --
9.1.1 History --
9.1.2 Appearance and structure --
9.1.3 Non-caloric --
9.1.4 No glycaemic or insulinaemic response --
9.1.5 Natural and organic --
9.1.6 High digestive tolerance --
9.1.7 Non-cariogenic --
9.1.8 Antioxidant properties --
9.1.9 Manufacturing process --
9.2 Organoleptic properties --
9.2.1 Sweetness intensity --
9.2.2 Sweetness profile --
9.2.3 Cooling effect --
9.2.4 Synergy with other sweeteners --
9.3 Physical and chemical properties --
9.3.1 Stability --
9.3.2 Solubility --
9.3.3 Melting point and other thermal characteristics --
9.3.4 Viscosity of solutions --
9.3.5 Hygroscopicity --
9.3.6 Boiling point elevation and freezing point depression --
9.3.7 Water activity at various concentrations versus sucrose --
9.4 Physiological properties and health benefits --
9.4.1 Digestion of carbohydrates --
9.4.2 Metabolic fate of erythritol --
9.4.3 Caloric value. 9.4.4 Digestive tolerance --
9.4.5 Glycaemic and insulinaemic response --
9.4.6 Dental health --
9.4.7 Antioxidant properties --
9.5 Applications --
9.5.1 Tabletop sweeteners --
9.5.2 Beverages --
9.5.3 Chewing gum --
9.5.4 Chocolate --
9.5.5 Candies --
9.5.6 Fondant --
9.5.7 Lozenges --
9.5.8 Bakery (pastry) products --
9.6 Safety --
9.6.1 Toxicologic studies --
9.6.2 Clinical studies --
9.6.3 Product specification and analyses --
9.7 Regulatory status --
10 Isomalt --
10.1 Description --
10.2 Organoleptic properties --
10.2.1 Sweetening potency versus sucrose --
10.2.2 Sweetness profiles versus sucrose --
10.2.3 Synergy and/or compatibility with other sweeteners --
10.3 Physical and chemical properties --
10.3.1 Stability --
10.3.2 Solubility --
10.3.3 Viscosity --
10.3.4 Heat of solution --
10.3.5 Boiling point elevation --
10.3.6 Hygroscopicity: moisture content at various relative humidities --
10.3.7 Water activity at various concentrations versus sucrose --
10.4 Physiological properties --
10.5 Applications --
10.5.1 Hard candies --
10.5.2 Chocolates --
10.5.3 Low boilings --
10.5.4 Chewing gums --
10.5.5 Pan coating --
10.5.6 Compressed tablets --
10.5.7 Baked goods --
10.5.8 Fruit spreads --
10.5.9 Breakfast cereals, cereal bars and muesli --
10.6 Safety --
10.7 Regulatory status: worldwide --
10.8 Conclusion --
11 Lactitol --
11.1 History --
11.2 Organoleptic properties --
11.3 Physical and chemical properties --
11.3.1 Stability --
11.3.2 Solubility --
11.3.3 Viscosity --
11.3.4 Heat of solution --
11.3.5 Boiling point elevation --
11.3.6 Hygroscopicity --
11.3.7 Water activity --
11.4 Physiological properties --
11.4.1 Metabolism --
11.5 Health benefits --
11.5.1 Lactitol as a prebiotic --
11.5.2 Lactitol to treat hepatic encephalopathy --
11.5.3 Lactitol and diabetes --
11.5.4 Tooth-protective properties --
11.6 Applications. 11.6.1 Chocolate --
11.6.2 Baked goods --
11.6.3 Chewing gum and confectionery --
11.6.4 Ice cream and frozen desserts --
11.6.5 Preserves --
11.6.6 Tablets --
11.7 Regulatory status --
11.8 Conclusion --
12 Maltitol and Maltitol Syrups --
12.1 Introduction --
12.2 Production --
12.2.1 Maltitol powder --
12.2.2 Maltitol syrups --
12.2.3 Polyglycitols --
12.3 Hydrogenation --
12.4 Structure --
12.5 Physico-chemical characteristics --
12.5.1 Chemical reactivity --
12.5.2 Compressibility --
12.5.3 Cooling effect (heat of solution) --
12.5.4 Humectancy --
12.5.5 Hygroscopicity --
12.5.6 Molecular weight --
12.5.7 Solubility --
12.5.8 Viscosity --
12.6 Physiological properties --
12.6.1 Calorific value --
12.6.2 Dental aspects --
12.6.3 Diabetic suitability --
12.6.4 Glycaemic response --
12.6.5 Toleration --
12.6.6 Sweetness --
12.6.7 Conclusion --
12.7 Applications in foods --
12.7.1 Chocolate --
12.7.2 Hard candy --
12.7.3 Caramels --
12.7.4 Sugar-free panning --
12.7.5 Dairy applications --
12.7.6 Bakery applications --
12.8 Legal status --
12.9 Safety --
12.10 Conclusion --
13 Sorbitol and Mannitol --
13.1 Introduction --
13.2 Production --
13.2.1 Sorbitol powder --
13.2.2 Sorbitol syrups --
13.2.3 Mannitol --
13.3 Hydrogenation --
13.4 Storage --
13.5 Structure --
13.6 Physico-chemical characteristics --
13.6.1 Chemical reactivity --
13.6.2 Compressibility --
13.6.3 Cooling effect --
13.6.4 Humectancy --
13.6.5 Hygroscopicity --
13.6.6 Molecular weight --
13.6.7 Solubility --
13.6.8 Viscosity --
13.7 Physiological properties --
13.7.1 Calorific value --
13.7.2 Dental aspects --
13.7.3 Diabetic suitability --
13.7.4 Glycaemic response --
13.7.5 Toleration --
13.7.6 Sweetness --
13.8 Applications in foods --
13.8.1 Gum --
13.8.2 Hard candy --
13.8.3 Tabletting --
13.8.4 Surimi --
13.8.5 Cooked sausages --
13.8.6 Baked goods --
13.8.7 Panning.

Abstract:

Sugar replacement in food and beverage manufacture no longer has just an economic benefit. The use of ingredients to improve the nutritional status of a food product is now one of the major driving forces in new product development. It is therefore important, as options for sugar replacement continue to increase, that expert knowledge and information in this area is readily available. Sweeteners and Sugar Alternatives in Food Technology provides the information required for sweetening and functional solutions, enabling manufacturers to produce processed foods that not only taste and perform as well as sugar-based products, but also offer consumer benefits such as calorie reduction, dental health benefits, digestive health benefits and improvements in long term disease risk through strategies such as dietary glycaemic control. Part I of this comprehensive book addresses these health and nutritional considerations. Part II covers non-nutritive, high-intensity sweeteners, providing insights into blending opportunities for qualitative and quantitative sweetness improvement as well as exhaustive application opportunities. Part III deals with reduced calorie bulk sweeteners, which offer bulk with fewer calories than sugar, and includes both the commercially successful polyols as well as tagatose, an emerging functional bulk sweetener. Part IV looks at the less well-established sweeteners that do not conform in all respects to what may be considered to be standard sweetening properties. Finally, Part V examines bulking agents and multifunctional ingredients. Summary tables at the end of each section provide valuable, concentrated data on each of the sweeteners covered. The book is directed at food scientists and technologists as well as ingredients suppliers.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.