Television at work : industrial media and American labor (eBook, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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Television at work : industrial media and American labor
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Television at work : industrial media and American labor

Author: Kit Hughes
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2020. ©2020
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This book explores how work, television, and waged labor come to have meaning in our everyday lives. However, it is not an analysis of workplace sitcoms or quality dramas. Instead, it explores the forgotten history of how American private sector workplaces used television in the twentieth century. In traces how, at the hands of employers, television physically and psychically managed workers and attempted to make  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Hughes, Kit.
Television at work.
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2020]
(DLC) 2019021018
(OCoLC)1102474137
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Kit Hughes
ISBN: 9780190855819 0190855819
OCLC Number: 1138875443
Awards: Winner of A CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title.
Description: 1 online resource (304 pages)
Contents: The persistence of [a] vision : the electronically mediated corporation prehistory --
"To extend vision beyond the horizon, to see the unseen" : industrial television in the post-war era flow --
Frankly boring and agonizingly slow : television moves to the office immediacy --
The other format wars : cartridges, cassettes, and making home work time-shifting --
"The people's network" : soft management with satellite business television narrowcasting.
Responsibility: Kit Hughes.

Abstract:

"This book explores how work, television, and waged labor come to have meaning in our everyday lives. However, it is not an analysis of workplace sitcoms or quality dramas. Instead, it explores the forgotten history of how American private sector workplaces used television in the twentieth century. In traces how, at the hands of employers, television physically and psychically managed workers and attempted to make work meaningful under the sign of capitalism. It also shows how the so-called domestic medium helped businesses shape labor relations and information architectures foundational to the twinned rise of the technologically mediated corporation and a globalizing information economy. Among other things, business and industry built extensive private television networks to distribute live and taped programming, leased satellite time for global 'meetings' and program distribution, created complex CCTV data search and retrieval systems, encouraged the use of videotape for worker self-evaluation, used video cassettes for training distributed workforces, and wired cantinas for employee entertainment. Television at work describes the myriad ways the medium served business' attempts to shape employees' relationships to their labor and the workplace in order to secure industrial efficiency, support corporate expansion, and inculcate preferred ideological orientations. narrowcasting, immediacy, time-shifting, flow, Post-Fordism, labor, audience labor, video, satellite, CCTV"--

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While the book emphasizes the subtle manipulation and shifting relationship between management and labor, interviews with key media producers round out this fascinating look at corporate television Read more...

 
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