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Television in India : satellites, politics, and cultural change

Author: Nalin Mehta
Publisher: Abingdon [England] ; New York, NY : Routledge, 2008.
Series: Media, culture, and social change in Asia series, 16.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This book examines the development of television in India since the early 1990s, and its implications for Indian society more widely. Until 1991, India possessed only a single state-owned television channel, but since then there has been a rapid expansion in independent satellite channels, and correspondingly strong growth in viewing figures. This book explores this transformation, explaining how television, a  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Aufsatzsammlung
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Nalin Mehta
ISBN: 9780415447591 0415447593 9780203895597 0203895592 0415546435 9780415546430
OCLC Number: 166382959
Description: ix, 170 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Satellite television, identity and globalisation in contemporary India / Nalin Mehta --
The Mahatma didn't like the movies and why it matters / Robin Jeffrey --
India talking / Nalin Mehta --
Politics without television / Maxine Loynd --
Muslims on television / Roshni Sengupta --
Give me a vote, and I will give you a TV set / Maya Ranganathan --
Soaps, serials, and the CPI(M), cricket beat them all / Boria Majumdar --
Bowling with the wind / Peter Hutton --
Changing contexts, new texts / Sharmistha Gooptu.
Series Title: Media, culture, and social change in Asia series, 16.
Responsibility: edited by Nalin Mehta.
More information:

Abstract:

"This book examines the development of television in India since the early 1990s, and its implications for Indian society more widely. Until 1991, India possessed only a single state-owned television channel, but since then there has been a rapid expansion in independent satellite channels, and correspondingly strong growth in viewing figures. This book explores this transformation, explaining how television, a medium that developed in the industrial West, was adapted to suit Indian conditions, and in turn has altered Indian social practices, making possible new ways of imagining identities, conducting politics and engaging with the state. In particular, satellite television initially came to India as the representative of global capitalism but it was appropriated by Indian entrepreneurs and producers who Indianised it." "Considering the full gamut of Indian television - from 'national' networks in English and Hindi to the state of regional language networks - this book elucidates the transformative impact of television on a range of important social practices, including politics and democracy, sport and identity formation, cinema and popular culture. Overall, it shows how the story of television in India is also the story of India's encounter with the forces of globalisation."--Jacket.

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schema:reviewBody""This book examines the development of television in India since the early 1990s, and its implications for Indian society more widely. Until 1991, India possessed only a single state-owned television channel, but since then there has been a rapid expansion in independent satellite channels, and correspondingly strong growth in viewing figures. This book explores this transformation, explaining how television, a medium that developed in the industrial West, was adapted to suit Indian conditions, and in turn has altered Indian social practices, making possible new ways of imagining identities, conducting politics and engaging with the state. In particular, satellite television initially came to India as the representative of global capitalism but it was appropriated by Indian entrepreneurs and producers who Indianised it." "Considering the full gamut of Indian television - from 'national' networks in English and Hindi to the state of regional language networks - this book elucidates the transformative impact of television on a range of important social practices, including politics and democracy, sport and identity formation, cinema and popular culture. Overall, it shows how the story of television in India is also the story of India's encounter with the forces of globalisation."--Jacket."
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