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The histological features and physical properties of eroded dental hard tissues.
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The histological features and physical properties of eroded dental hard tissues.

Author: C Ganss Affiliation: Department of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, Dental Clinic, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.; A Lussi; N Schlueter
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Monographs in oral science, 2014; 25: 99-107
Summary:
Erosive demineralisation causes characteristic histological features. In enamel, mineral is dissolved from the surface, resulting in a roughened structure similar to an etching pattern. If the acid impact continues, the initial surface mineral loss turns into bulk tissue loss and with time a visible defect can develop. The microhardness of the remaining surface is reduced, increasing the susceptibility to physical  Read more...
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: C Ganss Affiliation: Department of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, Dental Clinic, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.; A Lussi; N Schlueter
ISSN:0077-0892
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5600165440
Awards:

Abstract:

Erosive demineralisation causes characteristic histological features. In enamel, mineral is dissolved from the surface, resulting in a roughened structure similar to an etching pattern. If the acid impact continues, the initial surface mineral loss turns into bulk tissue loss and with time a visible defect can develop. The microhardness of the remaining surface is reduced, increasing the susceptibility to physical wear. The histology of eroded dentine is much more complex because the mineral component of the tissue is dissolved by acids whereas the organic part is remaining. At least in experimental erosion, a distinct zone of demineralised organic material develops, the thickness of which depends on the acid impact. This structure is of importance for many aspects, e.g. the progression rate or the interaction with active agents and physical impacts, and needs to be considered when quantifying mineral loss. The histology of experimental erosion is increasingly well understood, but there is lack of knowledge about the histology of in vivo lesions. For enamel erosion, it is reasonable to assume that the principal features may be similar, but the fate of the demineralised dentine matrix in the oral cavity is unclear. As dentine lesions normally appear hard clinically, it can be assumed that it is degraded by the variety of enzymes present in the oral cavity. Erosive tooth wear may lead to the formation of reactionary or reparative dentine.

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