Theoderic, the Goths, and the restoration of the Roman Empire (Downloadable article, 2008) [WorldCat.org]
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Theoderic, the Goths, and the restoration of the Roman Empire
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Theoderic, the Goths, and the restoration of the Roman Empire

Author: Jonathan J Arnold; University of Michigan.
Publisher: 2008.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Michigan, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Downloadable article : Document : Thesis/dissertation   Computer File : English
Publication:Dissertation Abstracts International, 69-09A.
Summary:
This dissertation places "Ostrogothic Italy," conventionally seen as a "barbarian" successor state in the West, firmly within the continuum of Roman history. It investigates conceptions of Romanness and the impact of Rome's imperial and cultural legacy during the late fifth and early sixth centuries, telling how a number of Italo-Roman elites were able to fit Theoderic and his Goths into an understanding of a
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Details

Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Article, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan J Arnold; University of Michigan.
ISBN: 9780549818021 0549818022
OCLC Number: 1194692408
Notes: Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 69-09, Section: A, page: 3697.
Adviser: Raymond H. Van Dam.
Description: 1 online resource
Other Titles: Dissertations & theses @ University of Michigan.

Abstract:

This dissertation places "Ostrogothic Italy," conventionally seen as a "barbarian" successor state in the West, firmly within the continuum of Roman history. It investigates conceptions of Romanness and the impact of Rome's imperial and cultural legacy during the late fifth and early sixth centuries, telling how a number of Italo-Roman elites were able to fit Theoderic and his Goths into an understanding of a revived and reinvigorated western Roman Empire. It demonstrates that for these individuals, men like Cassiodorus Senator and Magnus Felix Ennodius, Italy remained the western Roman Empire, despite the events of 476, and that Theoderic and his Goths, once qualifying as "barbarians," played fundamental roles in the perpetuation of Italy's Roman and imperial identity.^

These Italo-Romans believed that, until the arrival of the Ostrogoths, the western Empire had languished in a state of political and cultural decline, but that both Theoderic and his Goths had provided the necessary remedies. In the Goths Italo-Romans received valiant soldiers who once more defended the Empire against real "barbarians" and even reclaimed lost provinces in the name of Rome. By obeying and upholding Roman law, moreover, these Goths were imagined to have become tolerably Roman and, as such, could actually re-Romanize lapsing Italo-Romans and newly reclaimed provincials, such as the inhabitants of Gaul. In Theoderic Italo-Romans received the kind of emperor that they wanted, a princeps who lived up to the ideals of the Principate, looked and acted like an emperor, and restored Rome's rightful place as the head of the world.^

Theoderic's Roman upbringing in Constantinople, east-Roman career, and noble ancestry rendered him an acceptable and welcomed candidate to the imperial purple. More importantly, the positive alterations witnessed during his reign, such as the renovation of declining cities and reassertion of Roman dominance in the West, affirmed that he was a good Roman emperor. It was for these reasons, this dissertation suggests, that Italo-Romans were hailing the restoration of the western Roman Empire and declaring that a golden age had dawned.

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