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Time, history, and belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico

Author: Ross Hassig
Publisher: Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2001.
Edition/Format:   book_printbook : State or province government publication : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Publisher description: Based on their enormously complex calendars that recorded cycles of many kinds, the Aztecs and other ancient Mesoamerican civilizations are generally believed to have had a cyclical, rather than linear, conception of time and history. This boldly revisionist book challenges that understanding. Ross Hassig offers convincing evidence that for the Aztecs time was predominantly linear, that it was  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Hassig, Ross, 1945-
Time, history, and belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico.
Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2001
(OCoLC)606481089
Online version:
Hassig, Ross, 1945-
Time, history, and belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico.
Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2001
(OCoLC)607805026
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Ross Hassig
ISBN: 0292731396 9780292731394 029273140X 9780292731400
OCLC Number: 44167649
Description: xv, 220 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: 1. Time and the Interpretation of Other Cultures --
2. Outside the Focus --
3. Reinterpreting Aztec Perspectives --
4. Why the Aztecs Manipulated Time --
5. The Ripples of Time --
6. The Colonial Transition --
7. Time and Analysis.
Responsibility: Ross Hassig.
More information:

Abstract:

Challenges the view that Mesoamericans had a cyclical view of time, arguing instead that it was predominantly linear and manipulated by the state as a means of controlling a dispersed empire.  Read more...

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"Hassig's position is daring and potentially controversial and will be mandatory reading for those who deal with calendrical systems." --Dr. Barbara J. Price, Columbia University

 
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schema:description"Publisher description: Based on their enormously complex calendars that recorded cycles of many kinds, the Aztecs and other ancient Mesoamerican civilizations are generally believed to have had a cyclical, rather than linear, conception of time and history. This boldly revisionist book challenges that understanding. Ross Hassig offers convincing evidence that for the Aztecs time was predominantly linear, that it was manipulated by the state as a means of controlling a dispersed tribute empire, and that the Conquest cut off state control and severed the unity of the calendar, leaving only the lesser cycles. From these, he asserts, we have inadequately reconstructed the pre-Columbian calendar and so misunderstood the Aztec conception of time and history. Hassig first presents the traditional explanation of the Aztec calendrical system and its ideological functions and then marshals contrary evidence to argue that the Aztec elite deliberately used calendars and timekeeping to achieve practical political ends. He further traces how the Conquest played out in the temporal realm as Spanish conceptions of time partially displaced the Aztec ones. His findings promise to revolutionize our understanding of how the Aztecs and other Mesoamerican societies conceived of time and history."@en
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