Too Much Luck : the Mining Boom and Australia's Future. (eBook, 2011) [WorldCat.org]
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Too Much Luck : the Mining Boom and Australia's Future.

Author: Paul Cleary
Publisher: Melbourne : Schwartz Publishing Pty. Ltd, 2011.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
'We think we are the lucky country, but what we really have is dumb luck - too much luck, more than we know what to do with.'In Too Much Luck, Paul Cleary shows how the resource boom, which seems a blessing, could well become a curse. We have never seen a boom quite like this one. Under-taxed and under-regulated, multinational companies are making colossal profits by selling off non-renewable resources. New projects
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Cleary, Paul.
Too Much Luck : The Mining Boom and Australia's Future.
Melbourne : Schwartz Publishing Pty. Ltd, ©2011
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Paul Cleary
ISBN: 9781921870378 1921870370
OCLC Number: 1041736538
Language Note: English.
Description: 1 online resource (173 pages)
Contents: Too Much Luck; Contents; Preface; Bigger, Deeper, Emptier; Top Gear, Second and Reverse; We'll Spend It While We Can; Tax Us if You Can; Raiding the Food Bowl; Yours and Mine Country; How to Ride the Resources Rollercoaster; Endnotes; Acknowledgements; About the Author.

Abstract:

'We think we are the lucky country, but what we really have is dumb luck - too much luck, more than we know what to do with.'In Too Much Luck, Paul Cleary shows how the resource boom, which seems a blessing, could well become a curse. We have never seen a boom quite like this one. Under-taxed and under-regulated, multinational companies are making colossal profits by selling off non-renewable resources. New projects are being rushed through weekly, but who is looking out for the public interest? As the boom accelerates, it will drive the dollar higher and higher, and force up the cost of doing business for everyone else. Industries that involve many jobs, such as tourism and education, will fade away. What happens if commodity prices suddenly collapse, as they have in the past? Or worse, when the resources run out?Many countries before us have been caught by the resource trap: a heady period of boom and growth, followed by a painful bust. Paul Cleary maps out the pitfalls, counts the human and environmental costs, shows what has worked overseas and suggests a better way forward - one which would turn this one-off windfall into a lasting legacy. Shortlisted for the 2012 Queensland Literary Awards"a very timely and important book."--Australian Options"Paul Cleary argues that the resources boom is being classically mismanaged, indicting both federal and state governments for failing to regulate and tax properly the multinational corporations flocking to Australia to extract nonrenewable resources ... [a] fierce, concise book." - William Finnigan, The New Yorker"A timely and provocative analysis of some of the risks and opportunities associated with the present resources boom." - the Monthly"This may be the most distressing book you read all year" - Sydney Morning HeraldPaul Clear is a senior writer with the Australian and a researcher in public policy.

Atthe Australian National University.]]>.

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