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Toward the origins of peyote beadwork

Author: Gerald R Hubbell; Maude Wahlman
Publisher: Kansas City, Missouri : [University of Missouri-Kansas City], [2018] ©2018
Dissertation: M.A. University of Missouri-Kansas City 2018 (Department of Art and Art History).
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Summary:
Peyote beadwork is a nuanced and elegant art form. Hundreds of thousands of people today use peyote beadwork, including the Native American Church, powwow people, gourd dancers and Native Americans wanting a marker of Native Identity. Mainstream society has relegated this art form to the status of craft. It is virtually unstudied in the academic world. This paper accepts that objects so decorated are art, that is,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic dissertations
Academic theses
Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Gerald R Hubbell; Maude Wahlman
OCLC Number: 1042336639
Notes: "A thesis in Art History."
Advisor: Maude Southwell Wahlman.
Vita.
Description: 1 online resource (95 pages) : illustrations
Details: The full text of the thesis is available as an Adobe Acrobat .pdf file; Adobe Acrobat Reader required to view the file.; Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Contents: Introduction --
Methodology and evidence --
Origin theories --
Conclusions --
Appendix.
Responsibility: Gerald R. Hubbell.

Abstract:

Peyote beadwork is a nuanced and elegant art form. Hundreds of thousands of people today use peyote beadwork, including the Native American Church, powwow people, gourd dancers and Native Americans wanting a marker of Native Identity. Mainstream society has relegated this art form to the status of craft. It is virtually unstudied in the academic world. This paper accepts that objects so decorated are art, that is, expressions that are a means of communication among humans, and both a sacred art as well as a means of establishing cultural identity. The lack of academic study has led to hypotheses about its origin that obscure rather than reveal how it began. This paper aims to describe when and by whom the beadwork began, as well as how it was first disseminated.

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