Transformation by fire : the archaeology of cremation in cultural context (Book, 2014) [WorldCat.org]
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Transformation by fire : the archaeology of cremation in cultural context

Author: Ian Kuijt; Colin P Quinn; Gabriel Cooney
Publisher: Tucson : The University of Arizona Press, 2014.
Series: Amerind studies in anthropology.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This edited volume explores crematory practices as both an archaeological phenomenon and social practice, within cultural constructs. This exploration aims to illustrate the need to view cremation as a study of not only mortuary practices, but also of a dynamic social process that deals with 'death, movement of the body, and final deposition of remains' (Kuijt)"--Provided by publisher.
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ian Kuijt; Colin P Quinn; Gabriel Cooney
ISBN: 9780816531141 0816531145
OCLC Number: 876351060
Description: viii, 322 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: Part I. Fire and the Body : Reframing Perspectives on Cremation --
Contextualizing Cremations : Introduction to Fire and the Body / Colin P. Quinn, Ian Kuijt, and Gabriel Cooney --
Complexities of Terminologies and Intellectual Frameworks in Cremation Studies / Colin P. Quinn, Lynne Goldstein, Gabriel Cooney, Ian Kuijt (Mini-essay) --
Part II. Connecting Treatments of the Body : Cremation and Inhumation as Social Practices --
Socially Responsible and Culturally Conscious Approaches to Cremations : New and Old World / Liv Nilsson Stutz and David Hurst Thomas --
Reconcilable Differences : Cremation, Fragmentation and Inhumation in Mesolithic and Neolithic Sweden / Åsa M Larsson and Liv Nilsson Stutz --
The Temporal and Cultural Contexts of the Enigmatic Cremations from the Yokem Site, Illinois, USA / Mark R. Schurr and Della Collins Cook --
A Well-Urned Rest : Cremation and Inhumation in Early Anglo-Saxon England / Howard Williams --
Cremation, Gender and Concepts of the Self in the British Early Bronze Age / Joanna Brück --
Part III. Social Impact of Cremation : Transformation, Movement and the Body --
Reflections on the Visibility of Cremation as a Physical Event / Liv Nilsson Stutz and Ian Kuijt --
Pathways to Personhood : Cremation as a Social Practice among the Tucson Basin Hohokam / Jessica. I. Cerezo-Román --
Re/turn : Cremation, movement and re-collection in the Early Bronze Age of Denmark / Tim Flohr Sørensen --
The Role of Cremation in Mortuary Practice in the Irish Neolithic / Gabriel Cooney --
Transformation and Metaphors : Thoughts on Cremation Practices in the Precontact Midwestern United States / Lynne Goldstein and Katy Meyers --
Part IV. Reassembling the Pieces : Future Directions --
Reflections : Techniques, Potential, and Challenges of Cremations / Mark R. Schurr --
Future Directions for the Archaeology of Cremation / Jessica. I. Cerezo-Román and Howard Williams.
Series Title: Amerind studies in anthropology.
Responsibility: edited by Ian Kuijt, Colin P. Quinn, and Gabriel Cooney.

Abstract:

"This edited volume explores crematory practices as both an archaeological phenomenon and social practice, within cultural constructs. This exploration aims to illustrate the need to view cremation as a study of not only mortuary practices, but also of a dynamic social process that deals with 'death, movement of the body, and final deposition of remains' (Kuijt)"--Provided by publisher.

"Ash, bone, and memories are all that remains after cremation. Yet for societies and communities, the act of cremation after death is highly symbolic, rich with complex meaning, touching on what it means to be human. In the process of transforming the dead, the family, the community, and society as a whole create and partake in cultural symbolism. Cremation is a key area of archaeological research, but its complexity has been underappreciated and undertheorized. Transformation by Fire offers a fresh assessment of archaeological research on this widespread social practice. Editors Ian Kuijt, Colin P. Quinn, and Gabriel Cooney's volume examines cremation by documenting the material signatures of cremation events and processes, as well as its transformative impact on social relations and concepts of the body. Indeed, examining why and how people chose to cremate their dead serves as an important means of understanding how people in the past dealt with death, the body, and the social world. The contributors develop new perspectives on cremation as important mortuary practices and social transformations. Varying attitudes and beliefs on cremation and other forms of burial within the same cultural paradigm help us understand what constitutes the body and what occurs during its fiery transformation. In addition, they explore issues and interpretive perspectives in the archaeological study of cremation within and between different cultural contexts. The global and comparative perspectives on cremation render the book a unique contribution to the literature of anthropological and mortuary archaeology"--

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