The urban character of Christian worship : the origins, development, and meaning of stational liturgy (Book, 1987) [WorldCat.org]
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The urban character of Christian worship : the origins, development, and meaning of stational liturgy

Author: John F Baldovin
Publisher: Roma : Pont. Institutum Studiorum Orientalium, 1987.
Series: Orientalia Christiana analecta, 228.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
No serious study of the historical development of Christian worship can be undertaken today without attention to the social context in which the Christian liturgies were formed. In this study the author surveys three different urban contexts which were crucial for the development of the Byzantine and Roman rites in the early Middle Ages. The stational systems of Jerusalem, Rome and Constantinople are described in  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Baldovin, John F. (John Francis), 1947-
Urban character of Christian worship.
Roma : Pont. Institutum Studiorum Orientalium, 1987
(OCoLC)987863111
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John F Baldovin
ISBN: 9788872101278 8872101271
OCLC Number: 18426295
Description: 319 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Series Title: Orientalia Christiana analecta, 228.
Responsibility: John F. Baldovin.

Abstract:

No serious study of the historical development of Christian worship can be undertaken today without attention to the social context in which the Christian liturgies were formed. In this study the author surveys three different urban contexts which were crucial for the development of the Byzantine and Roman rites in the early Middle Ages. The stational systems of Jerusalem, Rome and Constantinople are described in detail and compared, reealing major similarities and differences in the worship inspired by these diverse urban milieux. In addition, the author sheds valuable light on the social development and impact of Christianity on Byzantine and Roman culture in the Late Antique and Early Medieval periods.

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