U.S. women writers and the discourses of colonialism, 1825-1861 (Book, 2003) [WorldCat.org]
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U.S. women writers and the discourses of colonialism, 1825-1861

Author: Etsuko Taketani
Publisher: Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Etsuko Taketani's U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861, an overdue examination of widely marginalized writings by women of the American antebellum period, presents a new model for evaluating U.S. relations and interactions with foreign countries in the colonial and postcolonial periods by examining the ways in which women writers were both proponents of colonization and subversive agents  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Etsuko Taketani
ISBN: 1572332271 9781572332270
OCLC Number: 51799308
Description: x, 236 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: PART ONE : PEDAGOGIES OF COLONIALISM --
Childhood and domestic colonialism : Lydia Maria Child's Juvenile miscellany --
Geography for American children : Sarah Tuttle, Lydia Huntley Sigourney, and African colonization --
Heterosexual national economy : Eliza Leslie, Catharine Beecher, and the child on the home front --
PART TWO : AN ALTERNATIVE HISTORY OF U.S. IMPERIALISM --
Colonial violence via opium addiction : Harriet Low's Macao --
"Queer" Burma : Emily Judson in southeast Asia --
Postcolonial Liberia : Sarah Hale's Africa --
Conclusion : "diasporic" whiteness and the Middle East in Maria Cummins's El fureidîs.
Other Titles: United States women writers and the discourses of colonialism, 1825-1861
Responsibility: Etsuko Taketani.
More information:

Abstract:

"Etsuko Taketani's U.S. Women Writers and the Discourses of Colonialism, 1825-1861, an overdue examination of widely marginalized writings by women of the American antebellum period, presents a new model for evaluating U.S. relations and interactions with foreign countries in the colonial and postcolonial periods by examining the ways in which women writers were both proponents of colonization and subversive agents for change. In this two-part book Taketani explores attempts to inculcate imperialist values through education in the works of Lydia Maria Child, Sarah Tuttle, Catharine Beecher, and others and the results of viewing the world through these values, as reflected in the writings of Harriet Low, Emily Judson, and Sarah Hale."--Jacket.

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