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Velvet beans

Author: S M Tracy; H S Coe; United States. Bureau of Plant Industry.
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1918.
Series: Farmers' bulletin (United States. Department of Agriculture), no. 962.
Edition/Format:   Print book : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The velvet bean is the most vigorous-growing annual legume cultivated in the United States. With the introduction and discovery of early-maturing varieties the area planted to velvet beans in the United States increased from less than 1,000,000 acres in 1915 to more than 5,000,000 acres in 1917. One or more varieties of velvet beans can be grown successfully in nearly all parts of the cotton belt. The Georgia and  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Tracy, S. M. (Samuel Mills), 1847-1920.
Velvet beans.
Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1918
(OCoLC)1010814054
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: S M Tracy; H S Coe; United States. Bureau of Plant Industry.
OCLC Number: 15229665
Notes: Cover title.
"Contribution from the Bureau of Plant Industry."
Description: 39 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
Contents: Description --
History --
Varieties --
Distribution --
Suitable soils --
Fertilizers --
Inoculation --
Time of planting --
Methods of planting --
Rate of seeding --
Continuous cropping --
Cultivation --
Uses of velvet-bean silage --
Harvesting --
Thrashing --
Grinding --
Feed --
Insects --
Some unpublished data on feeding velvet beans.
Series Title: Farmers' bulletin (United States. Department of Agriculture), no. 962.
Responsibility: S.M. Tracy and H.S. Coe.

Abstract:

"The velvet bean is the most vigorous-growing annual legume cultivated in the United States. With the introduction and discovery of early-maturing varieties the area planted to velvet beans in the United States increased from less than 1,000,000 acres in 1915 to more than 5,000,000 acres in 1917. One or more varieties of velvet beans can be grown successfully in nearly all parts of the cotton belt. The Georgia and Alabama varieties constituted at least 80 per cent of the acreage in 1917. As velvet beans are very susceptible to cool weather, they should not be planted until the soil has become warm. The crop is especially adapted to the well-drained portions of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain areas, and it is in these sections that the greatest acreage is to be found. Velvet beans will make a fair to good growth on the heavy clay soils in the northern portion of the cotton belt provided these soils are fairly fertile. Velvet beans are usually planted with corn. They may be planted in the same row as the corn or in separate rows. Two rows of corn to one of beans is the most popular method of planting. The yield of corn may be decreased slightly by the beans, but the value of the beans for green-manure and feeding purposes will be much greater than the loss to the corn crop. The most important use of the velvet bean is as a grazing crop for cattle and hogs in autumn and winter. The velvet bean is the best annual-legume crop grown in the South for soil improvement. On account of the extensive, tangled growth of vines it is necessary to pick velvet beans by hand. From 25 to 50 cents per hundred pounds is usually paid for picking the beans. The usual yield of velvet beans in the pods is from one-half to 1 ton per acre. Velvet beans make an excellent feed for cattle and hogs. Feeding experiments show that 2 to 2 1/2 pounds of velvet beans in the pod are equal to 1 pound of high-grade cottonseed meal."--Page 2.

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Primary Entity

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