skip to content
We Are the Machine : the Computer, the Internet, and Information in Contemporary German Literature. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

We Are the Machine : the Computer, the Internet, and Information in Contemporary German Literature.

Author: Youngman, Paul A.
Publisher: Camden House 2009.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Despite our embrace of the sheer utility and productivity it has made possible, the revolution in Information Technology has led to unease about its possible misuse, abuse, and even its eventual domination of humankind. That German culture is not immune to this sense of disquiet is reflected in a broad variety of German-language fiction since the 1940s. This first study of the literary reception of IT in  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic resource
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Youngman, Paul A.
ISBN: 1282795511 9781282795518
OCLC Number: 729025762
Description: 1 online resource (192)
Contents: Cover --
Contents --
Preface --
Acknowledgments --
Introduction: Machines, Computers, and the Liberal Humanist Subject --
1: Losing Ground to the Machine --
2: Fearing the Machine 8212; Two Nightmares in the 1990S --
3: Becoming the Machine --
Conclusion: Questions to Ponder --
Bibliography --
Index --
Backcover.

Abstract:

Despite our embrace of the sheer utility and productivity it has made possible, the revolution in Information Technology has led to unease about its possible misuse, abuse, and even its eventual domination of humankind. That German culture is not immune to this sense of disquiet is reflected in a broad variety of German-language fiction since the 1940s. This first study of the literary reception of IT in German-speaking lands begins with an analysis of a seminal novel from the beginning of the computer age, Heinrich Hauser's 'Gigant Hirn' (1948), then moves to its primary focus, the literature of the past two decades, ranging from Gerd Heidenreich's 'Die Nacht der Händler' (1995) to Daniel Glattauer's novel 'Gut gegen Nordwind' (2006). Along the way, it analyzes eleven works, including Barbara Frischmuth's novel 'Die Schrift des Freundes' (1998), René Pollesch's drama 'world wide web-slums' (2001), and Günter Grass's novella 'Im Krebsgang' (2003). As wildly different in approach as these works are, each has much to offer this investigation of the imaginary border dividing the human from the technological, a lingering, centuries-old construct created to ease the anxiety that technology has given rise to throughout the ages. Paul A. Youngman is associate professor of German at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte and Director of the Center for Humanities, Technology, and Science.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/729025762> # We Are the Machine : the Computer, the Internet, and Information in Contemporary German Literature.
    a schema:MediaObject, schema:Book, schema:CreativeWork ;
    library:oclcnum "729025762" ;
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/833.9209356/> ;
    schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793201776#Agent/youngman_paul_a> ; # Youngman, Paul A.
    schema:datePublished "2009" ;
    schema:description "Despite our embrace of the sheer utility and productivity it has made possible, the revolution in Information Technology has led to unease about its possible misuse, abuse, and even its eventual domination of humankind. That German culture is not immune to this sense of disquiet is reflected in a broad variety of German-language fiction since the 1940s. This first study of the literary reception of IT in German-speaking lands begins with an analysis of a seminal novel from the beginning of the computer age, Heinrich Hauser's 'Gigant Hirn' (1948), then moves to its primary focus, the literature of the past two decades, ranging from Gerd Heidenreich's 'Die Nacht der Händler' (1995) to Daniel Glattauer's novel 'Gut gegen Nordwind' (2006). Along the way, it analyzes eleven works, including Barbara Frischmuth's novel 'Die Schrift des Freundes' (1998), René Pollesch's drama 'world wide web-slums' (2001), and Günter Grass's novella 'Im Krebsgang' (2003). As wildly different in approach as these works are, each has much to offer this investigation of the imaginary border dividing the human from the technological, a lingering, centuries-old construct created to ease the anxiety that technology has given rise to throughout the ages. Paul A. Youngman is associate professor of German at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte and Director of the Center for Humanities, Technology, and Science."@en ;
    schema:description "Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Machines, Computers, and the Liberal Humanist Subject -- 1: Losing Ground to the Machine -- 2: Fearing the Machine 8212; Two Nightmares in the 1990S -- 3: Becoming the Machine -- Conclusion: Questions to Ponder -- Bibliography -- Index -- Backcover."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/793201776> ;
    schema:genre "Electronic resource"@en ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:name "We Are the Machine : the Computer, the Internet, and Information in Contemporary German Literature."@en ;
    schema:productID "729025762" ;
    schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/729025762#PublicationEvent/camden_house2009> ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793201776#Agent/camden_house> ; # Camden House
    schema:url <http://www.myilibrary.com?id=279551&ref=toc> ;
    schema:url <http://www.myilibrary.com?id=279551> ;
    schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781282795518> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/729025762> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793201776#Agent/camden_house> # Camden House
    a bgn:Agent ;
    schema:name "Camden House" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793201776#Agent/youngman_paul_a> # Youngman, Paul A.
    a bgn:Agent ;
    schema:name "Youngman, Paul A." ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781282795518>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
    schema:isbn "1282795511" ;
    schema:isbn "9781282795518" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/729025762>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
    schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/729025762> ; # We Are the Machine : the Computer, the Internet, and Information in Contemporary German Literature.
    schema:dateModified "2019-02-09" ;
    void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.