Wegen jüdischer Religion--Findelhaus : Zwangstaufen in Wien 1816-1868 (Book, 2001) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Wegen jüdischer Religion--Findelhaus : Zwangstaufen in Wien 1816-1868 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Wegen jüdischer Religion--Findelhaus : Zwangstaufen in Wien 1816-1868

Author: Anna Staudacher
Publisher: Frankfurt am Main ; New York : P. Lang, ©2001.
Edition/Format:   Print book : GermanView all editions and formats
Summary:
Discusses and analyzes forced conversion in Vienna between 1818-68. Argues that during this period more than 2,500 Jewish children born in the Viennese hospital Wiener Gebärhaus, a maternity clinic, were separated from their mothers and converted to Christianity. Until 1843 the names of the children were changed; some were transferred to the Findelhaus (foundling hospital) without a name. Ca. 80% of these children  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Registers (Lists)
Registers
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Staudacher, Anna, 1946-
Wegen jüdischer Religion--Findelhaus.
Frankfurt am Main ; New York : P. Lang, ©2001
(OCoLC)594387600
Online version:
Staudacher, Anna, 1946-
Wegen jüdischer Religion--Findelhaus.
Frankfurt am Main ; New York : P. Lang, ©2001
(OCoLC)607061128
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Anna Staudacher
ISBN: 3631351984 9783631351987
OCLC Number: 47767785
Language Note: Notes to the concordances also in English.
Description: 2 volumes : illustrations ; 21 cm
Contents: T. 1.
Responsibility: Anna L. Staudacher.

Abstract:

Discusses and analyzes forced conversion in Vienna between 1818-68. Argues that during this period more than 2,500 Jewish children born in the Viennese hospital Wiener Gebärhaus, a maternity clinic, were separated from their mothers and converted to Christianity. Until 1843 the names of the children were changed; some were transferred to the Findelhaus (foundling hospital) without a name. Ca. 80% of these children died due to illness. When a Jewish mother wanted to see her child, she had to first show her own certificate of baptism. States that most of the mothers of these converted children were lower class; often they were impecunious and unmarried girls who came to Vienna to work as servants. Christians viewed the conversion of Jewish children against the wishes of their parents, practiced for centuries, as justified, for the salvation of "innocent souls". Forced conversions became illegal in 1868. Pp. 29-445 in vol. 2 contain a concordance of the mothers' names with biograpical information, and pp. 447-586 present a list of the names of the children.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(22)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.