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We'll always have Paris : American tourists in France since 1930

Author: Harvey A Levenstein
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, ©2004.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
'We'll Always Have Paris' explores the bittersweet images of France common in American culture before & after World War II noting how travellers' experiences of French culture & French anti-Americanism constantly reinforced the deeply held belief that a famous country was spoilt only by the native inhabitants.
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Levenstein, Harvey A., 1938-
We'll always have Paris.
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, ©2004
(DLC) 2004003493
(OCoLC)54501527
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Harvey A Levenstein
ISBN: 9780226473802 0226473805
OCLC Number: 655219789
Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 382 pages) : illustrations
Contents: Contents; Preface; 1. Great Depression Follies; 2. War and Revival; 3. Loving and Hating; Abbreviations for Frequently Cited Sources; Notes; Index.
Responsibility: Harvey Levenstein.
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Abstract:

An exploration of how images of Americans' love/hate relationship with France came to flourish in the United States shapes a story of one nation's relationship to another from a historical  Read more...

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