skip to content
Who Moves Up the Job Ladder? Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Who Moves Up the Job Ladder?

Author: John Haltiwanger; Henry Hyatt; Erika McEntarfer; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. National Bureau of Economic Research 2017.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. w23693.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In this paper, we use linked employer-employee data to study the reallocation of heterogeneous workers between heterogeneous firms. We build on recent evidence of a cyclical job ladder that reallocates workers from low productivity to high productivity firms through job-to-job moves. In this paper we turn to the question of who moves up this job ladder, and the implications for worker sorting across firms. Not  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: John Haltiwanger; Henry Hyatt; Erika McEntarfer; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 1008877408
Notes: August 2017.
Description: 1 online resource
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. w23693.
Responsibility: John Haltiwanger, Henry Hyatt, Erika McEntarfer.

Abstract:

In this paper, we use linked employer-employee data to study the reallocation of heterogeneous workers between heterogeneous firms. We build on recent evidence of a cyclical job ladder that reallocates workers from low productivity to high productivity firms through job-to-job moves. In this paper we turn to the question of who moves up this job ladder, and the implications for worker sorting across firms. Not surprisingly, we find that job-to-job moves reallocate younger workers disproportionately from less productive to more productive firms. More surprisingly, especially in the context of the recent literature on assortative matching with on-the-job search, we find that job-to-job moves disproportionately reallocate less-educated workers up the job ladder. This finding holds even though we find that more educated workers are more likely to work with more productive firms. We find that while more educated workers are less likely to match to low productivity firms, they are even less likely to separate from them, with less educated workers both more likely to separate to a better employer in expansions and to be shaken off the ladder (separate to nonemployment) in contractions. Our findings underscore the cyclical role job-to-job moves play in matching workers to higher productivity and better paying employers.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1008877408> # Who Moves Up the Job Ladder?
    a schema:Book, schema:CreativeWork, schema:MediaObject ;
    library:oclcnum "1008877408" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/mau> ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Place/cambridge_mass> ; # Cambridge, Mass.
    schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Person/mcentarfer_erika> ; # Erika McEntarfer
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Organization/national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # National Bureau of Economic Research.
    schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Person/hyatt_henry> ; # Henry Hyatt
    schema:creator <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Person/haltiwanger_john> ; # John Haltiwanger
    schema:datePublished "2017" ;
    schema:description "In this paper, we use linked employer-employee data to study the reallocation of heterogeneous workers between heterogeneous firms. We build on recent evidence of a cyclical job ladder that reallocates workers from low productivity to high productivity firms through job-to-job moves. In this paper we turn to the question of who moves up this job ladder, and the implications for worker sorting across firms. Not surprisingly, we find that job-to-job moves reallocate younger workers disproportionately from less productive to more productive firms. More surprisingly, especially in the context of the recent literature on assortative matching with on-the-job search, we find that job-to-job moves disproportionately reallocate less-educated workers up the job ladder. This finding holds even though we find that more educated workers are more likely to work with more productive firms. We find that while more educated workers are less likely to match to low productivity firms, they are even less likely to separate from them, with less educated workers both more likely to separate to a better employer in expansions and to be shaken off the ladder (separate to nonemployment) in contractions. Our findings underscore the cyclical role job-to-job moves play in matching workers to higher productivity and better paying employers."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/4474646714> ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Series/nber_working_paper_series> ; # NBER working paper series
    schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Series/working_paper_series_national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;
    schema:name "Who Moves Up the Job Ladder?"@en ;
    schema:productID "1008877408" ;
    schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1008877408#PublicationEvent/cambridge_mass_national_bureau_of_economic_research2017> ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Agent/national_bureau_of_economic_research> ; # National Bureau of Economic Research
    schema:url <https://doi.org/10.3386/w23693> ;
    schema:url <http://papers.nber.org/papers/w23693> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1008877408> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Agent/national_bureau_of_economic_research> # National Bureau of Economic Research
    a bgn:Agent ;
    schema:name "National Bureau of Economic Research" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Organization/national_bureau_of_economic_research> # National Bureau of Economic Research.
    a schema:Organization ;
    schema:name "National Bureau of Economic Research." ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Person/haltiwanger_john> # John Haltiwanger
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Haltiwanger" ;
    schema:givenName "John" ;
    schema:name "John Haltiwanger" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Person/hyatt_henry> # Henry Hyatt
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Hyatt" ;
    schema:givenName "Henry" ;
    schema:name "Henry Hyatt" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Person/mcentarfer_erika> # Erika McEntarfer
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "McEntarfer" ;
    schema:givenName "Erika" ;
    schema:name "Erika McEntarfer" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Place/cambridge_mass> # Cambridge, Mass.
    a schema:Place ;
    schema:name "Cambridge, Mass." ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Series/nber_working_paper_series> # NBER working paper series
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1008877408> ; # Who Moves Up the Job Ladder?
    schema:name "NBER working paper series" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/4474646714#Series/working_paper_series_national_bureau_of_economic_research> # Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
    schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1008877408> ; # Who Moves Up the Job Ladder?
    schema:name "Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) ;" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.