Why bios? : on the relationship between gospel genre and implied audience (eBook, 2015) [WorldCat.org]
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Why bios? : on the relationship between gospel genre and implied audience
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Why bios? : on the relationship between gospel genre and implied audience

Author: Smith Marc Justin
Publisher: London, England ; New York, New York : Bloomsbury, 2015. ©2015
Series: Library of New Testament studies, 518.; T & T Clark library of biblical studies.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Justin Marc Smith argues that the gospels were intended to be addressed to a wide and varied audience. He does this by considering them to be works of ancient biography, comparative to the Greco-Roman biography. The earliest Christian interpreters of the Gospels did not understand their works to be sectarian documents. Rather, the wider context of Jesus literature in the second and third centuries points toward the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
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Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Justin, Smith Marc.
Why bios? : on the relationship between gospel genre and implied audience.
London, England ; New York, New York : Bloomsbury, ©2015
xvi, 257 pages
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Smith Marc Justin
ISBN: 9780567656612 0567656616
OCLC Number: 903956829
Description: 1 online resource (274 pages)
Contents: Acknowlegments; Abbreviations; Chapter 1 --
ASSESSING THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GOSPEL GENRE AND AUDIENCE; 1. Introduction: Bauckham's The Gospel for All Christians; 2. Richard Burridge's 'About People, by People, for People: Gospel Genre and Audiences'; 3. Responses to The Gospels for All Christians; 4. Genre: A Way Forward or a Dead End?; 5. The Proposed Course of the Current Monograph; Chapter 2 --
PROPOSING A NEW TYPOLOGY FOR GRAECO-ROMAN BIOGRAPHY: GENRE, SUB-GENRE AND QUESTIONS OF AUDIENCE; 1. Introduction: Genre, Sub-Genre and the Search for Meaning. 2. Genre Theory: Relational and Familial Functions of Genre and Sub-Genre3. Current Typologies of bíoi/Vitae; 4. What Audience? Considering the Graeco-Roman Audience; 5. Proposing a Typology for Graeco-Roman Biography; 6. Conclusion; Chapter 3 --
CRAFTING AUTHORITY IN THE PATRISTIC REFERENCES TO GOSPEL ORIGINS: AUTHORITATIVE PEOPLE, AUTHORITATIVE PLACES AND AUTHORITATIVE GOSPELS; 1. Introduction: Gospel Audiences and Patristic Interpretations; 2. Gospel-Origin Traditions in the Graeco-Roman Literary Context; 3. Gospel-Origin Traditions in Patristic Interpretation and Exegesis; 4. Conclusion. Chapter 4 --
AVOIDING CROSS-GENERIC COMPARISONS: THE ROLE OF GENRE IN ASSESSING AUDIENCE IN NON-CANONICAL AND CANONICAL GOSPELS1. Introduction: The Potential for Genre Analysis in Determining Gospel Audiences; 2. The 'Jewish-Christian Gospels'; 3. The Gospel of Thomas; 4. The Gospel of Peter; 5. Summary/Conclusion; Chapter 5 --
CRAFTING AUTHORITY DEFINING GOSPEL AUDIENCES: GOSPEL COMMUNITIES, GOSPEL AUDIENCES AND 'FOCUSED' Bíoi; 1. Introduction: Gospel Audiences or Gospel Communities? (Re)Considering Gospel Sub-Genre. 2. Biographical Communities or Biographical Audiences? Open and Focused Biographies3. The Canonical Gospels: 'Open' or 'Focused' Bíoi?; 4. Conclusion; Chapter 6 --
ENVISAGING GOSPEL AUDIENCES IN SPACE AND TIME: 'CONTEMPORARY' Bíoi AND THE GOSPELS FOR 'ALL NATIONS'; 1. Introduction: Multivalent Audience Groups in Graeco-Roman Biographies; 2. Author-Subject Relationships in 'Contemporary' Bíoi; 3. The 'All Nations' Motif in the Gospels; 4. Conclusion; Chapter 7 --
CONCLUSION; 1. Summary; 2. Concluding Remarks; APPENDICES; Bibliography; Index of References; Index of Authors.
Series Title: Library of New Testament studies, 518.; T & T Clark library of biblical studies.
Responsibility: Justin Marc Smith.

Abstract:

Justin Marc Smith argues that the gospels were intended to be addressed to a wide and varied audience. He does this by considering them to be works of ancient biography, comparative to the Greco-Roman biography. The earliest Christian interpreters of the Gospels did not understand their works to be sectarian documents. Rather, the wider context of Jesus literature in the second and third centuries points toward the broader Christian practice of writing and disseminating literary presentations of Jesus and Jesus traditions as widely as possible. Smith addresses the difficulty in reconstructin.

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