Wives Not Slaves : Patriarchy and Modernity in the Age of Revolutions. (Book, 2021) [WorldCat.org]
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Wives Not Slaves : Patriarchy and Modernity in the Age of Revolutions.
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Wives Not Slaves : Patriarchy and Modernity in the Age of Revolutions.

Author: Kirsten Sword
Publisher: University of Chicago Press 2021.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Is marriage a privilege or a right? A sacrament or a contract? Is it a public or a private matter? Where does ultimate jurisdiction over it lie? And when a marriage goes wrong, how do we adjudicate marital disputes-particularly in the usual circumstance, where men and women do not have equal access to power, justice, or even voice? These questions have long been with us because they defy easy, concrete answers.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Kirsten Sword
ISBN: 9780226757483 022675748X
OCLC Number: 1253364258
Description: 408 p.
Contents: Introduction: "If I am your Wife, I am not your Slave" The Political Uses of Ancient Patriarchy Divorce, Jurisdiction, and the Location of Law Debt and the Paradox of Masculine Possessory Rights in the Age of Revolutions 1. The Trials of Christopher and Elizabeth Lawson: An Introduction to Post-Reformation Debates about Marriage The Puritan Context of the Lawson Marriage Arguments for Separation and Divorce Weighing the Charges: Credibility, Economic Misconduct, Sexual Crime, Racial Boundaries, and SlanderLaw's Irresolution 2. Submit or Starve: Manby v. Scott and the Making of a Precedent Dynastic Marriage and Family Politics Divorce in Interregnum EnglandManby v. Scott and the Domestication of Politics Making a Precedent 3. The Runaway Press Runaway Slaves and Servants and the Development of Colonial Labor Systems Wayward Wives, Colonial Law, and a Shift in Practice The Rise of the Press 4. Marriage, Slavery, and Anglo-Imperial Jurisdictional Politics Disorder in the Legal System: Common Law, Equity, and Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction Colonial Household Conflicts, Local Law, and the Shadow of Imperial Norms in the 1720s Ancient Patriarchy and the Invention of "Possessory Rights" Repercussions of Imperial Intervention in Marriage Law The Rise of Blackstone The Echo Chamber of the 1760s 5. A Matter of Credit: Husbands' Claims "Lest she should run me in debt": Credibility and Masculine Vulnerability "Behaved in a very unbecoming manner . . . and has eloped from me": Implied Sexual Scandal "Some debates that have subsisted between us": Domestic Violence "Will not be persuaded, either by me or her best friends, to return": Preempting the Law "To her usual place of abode, and to her duty": Husbands versus Communities 6. "In Justice to my Character": Wives' Replies A Change in Values or a Change in Venue? Patterns over Time and Place Ann Wood's Advertisement "Endanger my life by dwelling with him": Ann Wood's Plea "On the Providence of God": Prayers and Curses "The few remaining days of my disconsolate life": Sentimental Dependence Authorship, Agency, and Remedy 7. Wives Not Slaves Liberty versus Loyalty: Marriage as Metaphor "If I am your Wife, I am not your Slave" "The Privilege of my Negroe Wench" "Her service & conjugal comfort . . . which he had a right to have" "We know better than to repeal our Masculine systems" 8. Rethinking the Revolutionary Road to Divorce Divorce and the Jurisdictional and Personal Politics of Revolution Divorce and Emancipation: A Useful False Equivalence Divorce as a Woman's Remedy: Revolutionary Expectations and the "First Families" of the United States "Down the Stream of Time Unnoticed": Family Secrets, Family Stories, and Legal Change Epilogue: "The Rigour of the Old Rule" Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Legal EducationManby v. Scott in the Nineteenth Century Acknowledgments Abbreviations and Source Notes Notes Index

Abstract:

"Is marriage a privilege or a right? A sacrament or a contract? Is it a public or a private matter? Where does ultimate jurisdiction over it lie? And when a marriage goes wrong, how do we adjudicate marital disputes-particularly in the usual circumstance, where men and women do not have equal access to power, justice, or even voice? These questions have long been with us because they defy easy, concrete answers. Kirsten Sword here reveals that contestation over such questions in early America drove debates over the roles and rights not only of women but of all unfree people. Sword shows how and why gendered hierarchies change-and why, frustratingly, they don't"--

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"Wives not Slaves is a must-read for anyone interested in the interplay between popular culture and law. Readers will appreciate both the narrative power of its case studies and the elegance of its Read more...

 
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