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Women who fly : goddesses, witches, mystics, and other airborne females

Author: Serinity Young
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2018]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Examines the motif of the flying woman as it appears in a wide variety of cultures and historical periods, in legends, myths, rituals, sacred narratives, and artistic productions. ... Throughout, Young demonstrates that female power has always been inextricably linked with female sexuality and that the desire to control it is a pervasive theme in these stories."--
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Young, Serinity.
Women who fly.
New York : Oxford University Press, 2018
(DLC) 2017052609
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Serinity Young
ISBN: 9780195307887 0195307887
OCLC Number: 982093061
Description: xiii, 358 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Introduction : Female flight ; Heroines, freedom, and captivity ; Transcendence and immanence ; Shape-shifting --
Earth, sky, women, and immortality : Earth, sky, and birds ; Magical flight, ascension, and assumption ; Dreams, women, and flying ; Humans, divinities, and birds : Apotheosis; Birds; Bird goddesses --
Part I. Supernatural women : Winged goddesses of sexuality, death, and immortality : Isis ; Women, death, sexuality, and immortality ; The ancient Near East ; Ancient Greece : Athena and the monstrous-feminine; Aphrodite; Nike --
The fall of the Valkyries : Brunhilde in the Volsungs saga ; Images and meanings ; Brunhilde in the Nibelungenlied ; Wagner's Brunhilde --
Swan maidens: captivity and sexuality : Urvaśī ; Images and meanings ; Northern European tales : Tchaikovsky's Swan lake ; Asian swan maidens : Feather robes and dance ; Two Middle Eastern tales : Hasan of Basra; Janshah --
Angels and fairies: male flight and contrary females : Angels and demons ; Fairies : Morgan le Fay; Fairy brides; Asian fairies --
Apsarās: enabling male immortality, part 1 : In Hinduism : Relations with heroes; Seducing ascetics; Kings, Devadāsīs, and fertility ; In Buddhism : Seductresses; The Saundarānanda --
Yoginīs and ḍākinīs: enabling male immortality, part 2 : Tantra ; Yoginīs : Yoginī temples; Practices and stories; Sexual yoga; Taming ; Ḍākinīs : Subduing; Tibetan practitioners --
Part II. Human women : Witches and succubi: male sexual fantasies : Medea ; Ancient witches and sexuality : Circe; The witch of Endor ; Succubi and Incubi ; Witches in Christian Europe : The Witches' sabbath; Women and the demonic; Flying --
Women shamans: fluctuations in female spiritual power : The Nišan shaman ; Becoming a shaman ; Magical flight, ritual dress, and spirit animals ; Gender ; Transvestism and sex change ; Sexuality --
Flying mystics, or the exceptional woman, part I : St. Christian the astonishing ; Flight and sanctity : St. Irene of Chrysobalanton; St. Elisabeth of Schönau ; Female and male mystics : Hadewijch of Brabant --
Flying mystics, or the exceptional woman, part II : Islam : Rābi'ah al-'Adawiyya; Other aerial Ṣūfī women ; Daoism : Sun Bu'er; Daoist beliefs and practices ; Buddhism : Human ḍākinīs; Machig Lapdron and Chod practice --
The aviatrix: nationalism, women, and heroism : Wonder Woman ; Amelia Earhart : Death and the heroine ; Hanna Reitsch ; Women, heroism, and militarism --
Conclusion : The exceptional woman ; Women and war.
Responsibility: Serinity Young.

Abstract:

"Examines the motif of the flying woman as it appears in a wide variety of cultures and historical periods, in legends, myths, rituals, sacred narratives, and artistic productions. ... Throughout, Young demonstrates that female power has always been inextricably linked with female sexuality and that the desire to control it is a pervasive theme in these stories."--

"From the beautiful apsaras of Hindu myth to the swan maidens of European fairy tales, stories of flying women-some carried by wings, others by clouds, rainbows, floating scarves, and flying horses-reveal the perennial fascination with and ambivalence about female power and sexuality. In Women Who Fly, Serinity Young examines the motif of the flying woman as it appears in a wide variety of cultures and historical periods, in legends, myths, rituals, sacred narratives, and artistic productions. She considers supernatural women like the Valkyries of Norse legend, who transport men to immortality; winged deities like the Greek goddesses Iris and Nike; figures of terror like the Furies, witches, and succubi; airborne Christian mystics; and wayward, dangerous women like Lilith and Morgan le Fay. Looking beyond the supernatural, Young examines the modern mythology surrounding twentieth-century female aviators like Amelia Earhart and Hanna Reitsch. Throughout, Young demonstrates that female power has always been inextricably linked with female sexuality and that the desire to control it is a pervasive theme in these stories. This is vividly depicted, for example, in the twelfth-century Niebelungenlied, in which the proud warrior-queen Brünnhilde loses her great physical strength when she is tricked into surrendering her virginity. Even in the twentieth-century the same idea is reflected in the exploits of the comic book and film character Wonder Woman who, Young suggests, retains her physical strength only because her love for fellow aviator Steve Trevor goes unrequited."--

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The book is the only one I know on this theme, and it is a marvelous idea: flying women. The scholarship is sound, the organization clear and simple, and the writing lively and confident. I can't Read more...

 
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<http:\/\/worldcat.org\/entity\/work\/data\/4646961636#CreativeWork\/women_who_fly<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:CreativeWork<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nrdfs:label<\/a> \"Women who fly.<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:description<\/a> \"Online version:<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isSimilarTo<\/a> <http:\/\/www.worldcat.org\/oclc\/982093061<\/a>> ; # Women who fly : goddesses, witches, mystics, and other airborne females<\/span>\n\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n
<http:\/\/worldcat.org\/isbn\/9780195307887<\/a>>\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0a \nschema:ProductModel<\/a> ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"0195307887<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\nschema:isbn<\/a> \"9780195307887<\/span>\" ;\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\u00A0.\n\n\n<\/div>\n