Women, writing, and the public sphere : 1700-1830 (Book, 2001) [WorldCat.org]
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Women, writing, and the public sphere : 1700-1830

Author: Elizabeth Eger
Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Examining the dynamic relation between women and the public sphere between 1700 and 1830, this text draws on literary and visual evidence to raise questions of scandal and display, improvement, virtue and morality.
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth Eger
ISBN: 0521771064 9780521771061
OCLC Number: 44039812
Description: xii, 320 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction: women, writing and representation / Elizabeth Eger [and others]. --
Coffee-women, The spectator and the public sphere in the early eighteenth century / Markman Ellis. --
Misses, murderesses and magdalens: women in the public eye / Caroline Gonda. --
The choice of Hercules: the polite arts and 'female excellence' in eighteenth-century London / Charlotte Grant. --
Representing culture: The nine living muses of Great Britain (1779) / Elizabeth Eger. --
A moral purchase: femininity, commerce and abolition, 1788-1792 / Kate Davies. --
Bluestocking feminism / Gary Kelly. --
Catharine Macaulay: history, republicanism and the public sphere / Susan Wiseman. --
Gender, nation and revolution : Maria Edgeworth and Stéphanie-Félicité de Genlis / Cliona Ó Gallchoir. --
Salons, alps and cordilleras: Helen Maria Williams, Alex von Humboldt and the discourse of romantic travel / Nigel Leask. --
The most public sphere of all : the family / Sylvana Tomaselli. --
Theorising public opinion: Elizabeth Hamilton's model of self, sympathy and society / Penny Warburton. --
Intimate connections: scandalous memoirs and epistolary indiscretion / Mary Jacobus.
Responsibility: edited by Elizabeth Eger [and others].
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Abstract:

In this book, an international team of specialists examine the dynamic relation between women and the public sphere between 1700 and 1830. Drawing on literary and visual evidence, contributors  Read more...

Table of Contents:

by WTYILL@KUK (WorldCat user on 2007-12-21)

CONTENTS “Contents” “List of illustrations” “page” vii “List of contributors” ix “Preface and acknowledgements” xii Introduction: women, writing and representation 1 “Elizabeth Eger, Charlotte Grant, Clíona Ơ Gallchoir and Penny Warburton” PART I WOMEN IN THE PUBLIC EYE 1 Coffee-women, “The Spectator” and the public sphere in the early eighteenth century27 “Markman Ellis” 2 Misses, Murderesses and Magdalens: women in the public eye 53 “Caroline Gonda” PART II CONSUMING ARTS 3 The choice of Hercules: the polite arts and ‘female excellence’ in eighteenth-century London 75 “Charlotte Grant” 4 Representing culture: “The Nine Living Muses of Great Britain” (1779) 104 “Elizabeth Eger” 5 A moral purchase: femininity, commerce and abolition, 1788-1792 133 “Kate Davies” PART III LEARNED LADIES: FROM BLUESTOCKINGS TO COSMOPOLITAN INTELLECTUALS 6 Bluestocking feminism 163 “Gary Kelly” 7 Catharine Macaulay: history, republicanism and the public sphere 181 “Susan Wiseman” 8 Gender, nation and revolution: Maria Edgeworth and Stéphanie-Félicité de Genlis 200 “Clíona Ơ Gallchoir” 9 Salons, Alps, and Cordilleras: Helen Maria Williams, Alex von Humboldt and the discourse of the Romantic travel 217 “Nigel Leask” PART IV THE FEMALE SUBJECT 10 The most public sphere of all: the family 239 “Sylvana Tomaselli” 11 Theorising public opinion: Elizabeth Hamilton’s model of self, sympathy and society 257 “Penny Warburton” 12 Intimate connections: scandalous memoirs and epistolary indiscretion 274 “Mary Jacobus” “Bibliography” 290 “Index” 313 “Illustrations” 1 Frontispiece to James Miller’s comedy “The Coffee-HouseA Dramatick Pience. As it is Perform’d at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lame (London: J. Watts, 1737). Reproduced by permission of the Syndics of the Cambridge University Library. “page” 40 2 Hogarth, “The Harlot’s Progress”, Plate I. ©The British Museum. 77 3 Simon Gribelin (after Paolo de Matthaies), “The Judgement of Hercules” (1713), in Anthony Ashley Cooper, Earl of Shaftesbury, “Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times,” 3rd edn (London: John Derby, 1723). Reproduced by permission of the Syndics of the Cambridge University Library. 79 4 Edward Fisher (after Joshua Reynolds), “Garrick between Tragedy and Comedy” (1762). ©The British Museum. 89 5 Angelica Kauffman, “Self-Portrait: Hesitating Between the Arts of Music and Painting” (1791). Oil on canvas. Reproduced by kind permission of The Royal Collection. © 1999, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. 90 6 Johann Zoffany, “The Academicians of the Royal Academy” (1772). Oil on canvas, 100.7cm by 147.3cm. Reproduced by kind permission of the Winn Family and The National Trust (Nostell Priory, Yorks). 91 7 Hannah Rush, “compartment with Cattle” (1758). Reproduced by kind permission of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. 91 8 James Barry, “The Distribution of the Premiums to the Society of Arts.” Mural, 462.28 cm by 360.68cm. Fifth picture in “The Progress of Human Knowledge and Culture” (1778-1783). Reproduced by kind permission of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. 96 9 Ackermann (after Pugin and Rowlandson), “The Society’s ‘Great Room’” (1809). Reproduced by kind permission of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. 98 10 Richard Samuel, “The Nine Living Muses of Great Britain.” Oil on canvas, 132.1cm by 154.9cm. Exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1779. By courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London. 105 11 Frontispiece to Thomas Heywood, “Nine Books of Various History Concerninge Women” (1624). Reproduced by kind permission of the Syndics of the Cambridge University Library. 110 12 Page (after Samuel), “The Nine Living Muses of Great Britain.” (c. 1778). Engraving, 12.5cm by 10 cm. In “Johnson’s Ladies’ New and Polite Pocket Memorandum for 1778.” ©The British Museum. 112 13 Angelica Kauffman, “Self-Portrait in the Character of Painting Embraced by Poetry” (1782). Oil on canvas. The Iveagh Bequest, Kenwood. By kind permission of English Heritage. 120 14 G.S. and I.G. Facius (after Angelica Kauffman), “Sappho Inspired by Love.” Published by Boydell, 1778. ©The British Museum. 121

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"Nuanced and expertly argued, this collection clearly makes an important contribution to the scholarship of separate spheres." Albion "The twelve essays included in Women, Writing and the Public Read more...

 
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