Word became flesh : a rapprochement of Christian natural law and radical Christological ethics (eBook, 2016) [WorldCat.org]
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Word became flesh : a rapprochement of Christian natural law and radical Christological ethics

Author: David Griffin
Publisher: Eugene, Oregon : Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2016. ©2016
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Is following Jesus natural? Many would say no, but this book argues yes. Saying no suggests that grace and human nature are alternate moral categories. Saying yes implies that our humanity is gracious in origin, capacity, and intent. Much of this discussion hangs on what is meant by ""nature"" and ""natural, "" and this book explores these ideas creationly and christologically. Part One considers natural law as  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
(OCoLC)950893836
Named Person: Jesus Christ; Jesus Christ.
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: David Griffin
ISBN: 9781498239264 1498239269
OCLC Number: 973807808
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Pages:1 to 25; Pages:26 to 50; Pages:51 to 75; Pages:76 to 100; Pages:101 to 125; Pages:126 to 150; Pages:151 to 175; Pages:176 to 200; Pages:201 to 225; Pages:226 to 250; Pages:251 to 275; Pages:276 to 290.
Responsibility: David Griffin.

Abstract:

Is following Jesus natural? Many would say no, but this book argues yes. Saying no suggests that grace and human nature are alternate moral categories. Saying yes implies that our humanity is gracious in origin, capacity, and intent. Much of this discussion hangs on what is meant by ""nature"" and ""natural, "" and this book explores these ideas creationly and christologically. Part One considers natural law as commonly found in the classical Christian tradition. Part Two explores the radical christological tradition of Anabaptism. Part Three then proposes the two-nature christology of the Chal.

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