Work stress and problem alcohol behavior: a test of the spillover model (Article, 1998) [WorldCat.org]
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Work stress and problem alcohol behavior: a test of the spillover model
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Work stress and problem alcohol behavior: a test of the spillover model

Author: Leon Grunberg Affiliation: University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 98416, U.S.A.; Sarah Moore Affiliation: University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 98416, U.S.A.; Edward S Greenberg Affiliation: University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, U.S.A.
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Journal of Organizational Behavior, v19 n5 (September 1998): 487-502
Other Databases: WorldCatWorldCat
Summary:
Although previous research has found weak support for the model of stressful work ‘spilling over’ to negative coping responses during nonwork hours, we argue that a variety of conceptual and methodological problems may partially explain the weak and inconsistent findings. Two important shortcomings are inadequately specified models and a failure to consider nonescapist responses to job-related stress. We therefore  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Leon Grunberg Affiliation: University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 98416, U.S.A.; Sarah Moore Affiliation: University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 98416, U.S.A.; Edward S Greenberg Affiliation: University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, U.S.A.
ISSN:0894-3796
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5151526242
Notes: Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1
Number of References: 43
Awards:

Abstract:

Although previous research has found weak support for the model of stressful work ‘spilling over’ to negative coping responses during nonwork hours, we argue that a variety of conceptual and methodological problems may partially explain the weak and inconsistent findings. Two important shortcomings are inadequately specified models and a failure to consider nonescapist responses to job-related stress. We therefore propose that there may be escapist (i.e. increased drinking, working through job dissatisfaction for those who believe that alcohol consumption is an effective means to reduce stress) and nonescapist (i.e. decreased drinking for those who are dissatisfied with their jobs but do not believe alcohol is an effective coping strategy) responses to work stress. These hypotheses were tested on a sample of 972 production workers in the Pacific northwest. Results show moderate support for the existence of both escapist and nonescapist responses to job-related stresses. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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