Writing instruction in nineteenth-century American colleges (Book, 1984) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Writing instruction in nineteenth-century American colleges Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Writing instruction in nineteenth-century American colleges

Author: James A Berlin; Donald C Stewart
Publisher: Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, ©1984.
Series: Studies in writing & rhetoric.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Defining a rhetoric as a social invention arising out of a particular time, place, and set of circumstances, Berlin notes that "no rhetoric--not Plato's or Aristotle's or Quintilian's or Perelman's--is permanent." At any given time several rhetorics vie for supremacy, with each attracting adherents representing various views of reality expressed through a rhetoric. Traditionally rhetoric has been seen as based on  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Berlin, James A.
Writing instruction in nineteenth-century American colleges.
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, ©1984
(OCoLC)560074607
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James A Berlin; Donald C Stewart
ISBN: 0809311666 9780809311668
OCLC Number: 10046638
Notes: "Published for Conference on College Composition and Communication"
Description: x, 114 pages ; 22 cm.
Contents: The method and the major theories ; The three rhetorics --
The demise of the classical tradition --
The triumph of eighteenth-century rhetoric ; Campbell --
Blair --
Whately --
Pedagogy --
The social setting --
American imitators --
Emerson and Romantic rhetoric --
Current-traditional rhetoric ; The scientistic approach ; Invention --
Arrangement --
Style --
The consequences --
An alternative voice : Fred Newton Scott --
Postscript on the present.
Series Title: Studies in writing & rhetoric.
Responsibility: James A. Berlin ; with a foreword by Donald C. Stewart.
More information:

Abstract:

Defining a rhetoric as a social invention arising out of a particular time, place, and set of circumstances, Berlin notes that "no rhetoric--not Plato's or Aristotle's or Quintilian's or Perelman's--is permanent." At any given time several rhetorics vie for supremacy, with each attracting adherents representing various views of reality expressed through a rhetoric. Traditionally rhetoric has been seen as based on four interacting elements: "reality, writer or speaker, audience, and language." As the definitions of the elements change or as the interactions between elements change, rhetoric changes. In this interpretive study Berlin classifies the three nineteenth-century rhetorics as classical, psychological-epistemological, and romantic--a uniquely American development growing out of the transcendental movement. In each case studying the rhetoric provides insights into society and the beliefs of the people: what is appearance, and what is reality.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.