skip to content
Xunzi and early Chinese naturalism Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Xunzi and early Chinese naturalism

Author: Janghee Lee
Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, ©2005.
Series: SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Early Chinese naturalism refers to a unique Chinese philosophical orientation that seeks no math is in the realm of nature. In early China, where the notion of transcendence never occupied a central position in philosophical discourse, it was perfectly reasonable for philosophers to turn to "naturalness," or "spontaneity" of nature as a source of value of guidance for a way of life. Janghee Lee argues that the most  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Xunzi; Xunzi; Xunzi; Xunzi; Xunzi; Xunzi.
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Janghee Lee
ISBN: 0791461971 9780791461976 9780791461983 079146198X
OCLC Number: 55764615
Description: vi, 135 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Ch. 1. Introduction --
Ch. 2. Background --
Ch. 3. notions of Tian [actual symbol not reproducible] and Xing [actual symbol not reproducible] in Xunzi --
Ch. 4. notion of Xin [actual symbol not reproducible] --
Ch. 5. Li [actual symbol not reproducible] and morality --
Ch. 6. Naturalism and autonomy --
Ch. 7. Xunzi in the history of Chinese philosophy.
Series Title: SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture.
Responsibility: Janghee Lee.
More information:

Abstract:

"Early Chinese naturalism refers to a unique Chinese philosophical orientation that seeks no math is in the realm of nature. In early China, where the notion of transcendence never occupied a central position in philosophical discourse, it was perfectly reasonable for philosophers to turn to "naturalness," or "spontaneity" of nature as a source of value of guidance for a way of life. Janghee Lee argues that the most prominent features of Xunzi's philosophy - his famous doctrine that human nature is bad and his strong emphasis as usual - can best be understood as Xunzi's critical response to the naturalism trend of his time, which can be found not only in Daoist philosophers like Zhuangzi, but also in other Confucian philosophers such as Mencius. According to the author Xunzi's concept of xin (mind heart) provides a crucial hint for understanding his ritual oriented philosophy, clearly contrasted with the naturalistic tendencies of early Chinese philosophy."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55764615> # Xunzi and early Chinese naturalism
    a schema:Book, schema:CreativeWork ;
   library:oclcnum "55764615" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Place/albany> ; # Albany
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/nyu> ;
   rdfs:comment "Unknown 'gen' value: sgp" ;
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Topic/ethiek> ; # Ethiek
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/915833> ; # Ethics
   schema:about <http://viaf.org/viaf/68033252> ; # Xunzi.
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Topic/ethik> ; # Ethik
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Topic/morale_confuceenne> ; # Morale confucéenne
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Topic/chinese_filosofie> ; # Chinese filosofie
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Person/xunzi_340_b_c_245_b_c> ; # Xunzi
   schema:about <http://viaf.org/viaf/260992076> ; # Xunzi
   schema:about <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/classification/B128> ;
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/875050> ; # Confucian ethics
   schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/171/e22/> ;
   schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
   schema:copyrightYear "2005" ;
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/75707638> ; # Janghee Lee
   schema:datePublished "2005" ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/954414> ;
   schema:genre "Government publication"@en ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:isPartOf <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Series/suny_series_in_chinese_philosophy_and_culture> ; # SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture.
   schema:name "Xunzi and early Chinese naturalism"@en ;
   schema:productID "55764615" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/55764615#PublicationEvent/albany_state_university_of_new_york_press_2005> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Agent/state_university_of_new_york_press> ; # State University of New York Press
   schema:reviews <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/55764615#Review/-519564981> ;
   schema:url <http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0419/2004015113.html> ;
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780791461976> ;
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780791461983> ;
   umbel:isLike <http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GBA641622> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/55764615> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Agent/state_university_of_new_york_press> # State University of New York Press
    a bgn:Agent ;
   schema:name "State University of New York Press" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Series/suny_series_in_chinese_philosophy_and_culture> # SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture.
    a bgn:PublicationSeries ;
   schema:hasPart <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55764615> ; # Xunzi and early Chinese naturalism
   schema:name "SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture." ;
   schema:name "SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Topic/chinese_filosofie> # Chinese filosofie
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Chinese filosofie"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/954414#Topic/morale_confuceenne> # Morale confucéenne
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Morale confucéenne"@fr ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/875050> # Confucian ethics
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Confucian ethics"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/915833> # Ethics
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Ethics"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/260992076> # Xunzi
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:birthDate "ca. v340/298" ;
   schema:birthDate "340" ;
   schema:birthDate "340 B.C." ;
   schema:deathDate "v245/230" ;
   schema:deathDate "245 av J-C" ;
   schema:deathDate "245 BC" ;
   schema:givenName "Xunzi" ;
   schema:name "Xunzi" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/68033252> # Xunzi.
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:name "Xunzi." ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/75707638> # Janghee Lee
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Lee" ;
   schema:givenName "Janghee" ;
   schema:name "Janghee Lee" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780791461976>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "0791461971" ;
   schema:isbn "9780791461976" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780791461983>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "079146198X" ;
   schema:isbn "9780791461983" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/55764615#Review/-519564981>
    a schema:Review ;
   schema:itemReviewed <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55764615> ; # Xunzi and early Chinese naturalism
   schema:reviewBody ""Early Chinese naturalism refers to a unique Chinese philosophical orientation that seeks no math is in the realm of nature. In early China, where the notion of transcendence never occupied a central position in philosophical discourse, it was perfectly reasonable for philosophers to turn to "naturalness," or "spontaneity" of nature as a source of value of guidance for a way of life. Janghee Lee argues that the most prominent features of Xunzi's philosophy - his famous doctrine that human nature is bad and his strong emphasis as usual - can best be understood as Xunzi's critical response to the naturalism trend of his time, which can be found not only in Daoist philosophers like Zhuangzi, but also in other Confucian philosophers such as Mencius. According to the author Xunzi's concept of xin (mind heart) provides a crucial hint for understanding his ritual oriented philosophy, clearly contrasted with the naturalistic tendencies of early Chinese philosophy."--Jacket." ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.