Tredennick, Hugh [WorldCat.org]
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Tredennick, Hugh

Overview
Works: 293 works in 1,004 publications in 7 languages and 9,690 library holdings
Genres: Trials, litigation, etc  Trial and arbitral proceedings  Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Philosophical fiction  Commentaries  Biographies 
Roles: Translator, Editor, Other, Author, Author of introduction, tra, Commentator, Contributor
Classifications: B430.A5, 171.3
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Hugh Tredennick
Publications by Hugh Tredennick
Publications by Hugh Tredennick, published posthumously.
Most widely held works by Hugh Tredennick
The last days of Socrates by Plato( Book )
95 editions published between 1954 and 2011 in English and Chinese and held by 2,130 libraries worldwide
Socrates spent a lifetime analysing ethical issues, and the Euthyphro finds him outside the court-house, still debating the nature of piety with an arrogant acquaintance. The Apology is both a robust rebuttal to the charges of impiety and corrupting young minds and a definitive defence of the philosopher's life. Later, condemned and imprisoned in the Crito, Socrates counters the arguments of friends urging him to escape. And finally, in the Phaedo, Plato shows him calmly confident in the face of death, skilfully arguing the case for the immortality of the soul. Such works, as Harold Tarrant explains in his fine introduction to this revised edition, are no longer regarded by scholars as direct transcriptions of real events; their power to move us - and to challenge our moral assumptions - remains undiminished
Metaphysics by Aristotle( Book )
97 editions published between 1933 and 2015 in 6 languages and held by 1,369 libraries worldwide
"Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BCE, was the son of Nicomachus, a physician, and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367-347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343-2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of 'Peripatetics'), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea, where he died in 322. Nearly all the works Aristotle prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as follows: I Practical: Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Economics (on the good of the family); On Virtues and Vices. II Logical: Categories; Analytics (Prior and Posterior); Interpretation; Refutations used by Sophists; Topica. III Physical: Twenty-six works (some suspect) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc. IV Metaphysics: on being as being. V Art: Rhetoric and Poetics. VI Other works including the Constitution of Athens; more works also of doubtful authorship. VII Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics."--Publisher description
The categories ; On interpretation by Aristotle( Book )
19 editions published between 1938 and 2015 in English and Greek, Modern [1453- ] and held by 790 libraries worldwide
"Aristotle, great Greek Philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 B.C., was the son of a medical doctor Nicomachus and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there 367-347; spent three years at the court of a former pupil Hermeias in Asia Minor and married Pythias a relation of his; after some time at Mitylene, in 343-2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be a tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander, and had other pupils. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of 'Peripatetics'), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea and died there in 322. Nearly all the works he prepared for publication are lost, the priceless ones extant being lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). I Practical. Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Economics (on the good of the family); On virtues and Vices; II Logical. Categories; Analytics (Prior and Posterior): Interpretation; Refutations used by Sophists; Topica. III Physical. Twenty six works (some suspect) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc. IV Metaphysics on being as being. V Art Rhetoric and Poetic. VI Other works including the Constitution of Athens; more works also doubtful authorship. VII Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics. -- Jacket
The ethics of Aristotle : the Nicomachean ethics by Aristotle( Book )
25 editions published between 1955 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 662 libraries worldwide
A vigorous polemicist as well as a rational philosopher, Aristotle has the task in his Ethics of demonstrating how men become good and why happiness can, and should, be our goal
The Organon by Aristotle( Book )
11 editions published in 1955 in English and Greek, Modern [1453- ] and held by 608 libraries worldwide
The last days of Socrates : Euthyphro, the apology, Crito, Phaedo by Plato( Book )
59 editions published between 1954 and 2003 in English and held by 600 libraries worldwide
"Toward the end of The Apology, Socrates makes a statement that resonates even with those who have never read Plato: "I tell you that ... examining both myself and others is really the very best thing that a man can do, and that life without this sort of examination is not worth living" (p. 63). The Apology, Euthyphro, Crito, and Phaedo, which depict Socrates' activities just prior to his trial until his death, hold a central place among the works of Plato. They sum up the philosophical career of Socrates, protagonist of most of the Platonic dialogues. But this summing up does not imply the end of the examinations Socrates pursued. On the contrary, during his last days, Socrates rigorously continued the kind of inquiries he had pursued all his life, even at the risk of execution, and he enjoined his companions to continue them when he was gone."
Posterior analytics by Aristotle( Book )
6 editions published between 1960 and 1966 in English and held by 526 libraries worldwide
Nearly all the works Aristotle (384-322 BCE) prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as practical; logical; physical; metaphysical; on art; other; fragments
Nicomachean ethics by Aristotle( Book )
12 editions published between 1976 and 2004 in English and held by 378 libraries worldwide
This translation of Aristotle's 'The Nicomachean Ethics' has been revised and supplemented with further appendices. It also includes new further reading and a chronology of the life of Aristotle
Posterior analytics by Aristotle( Book )
14 editions published between 1960 and 2015 in 3 languages and held by 258 libraries worldwide
"ARISTOTLE, great Greek Philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 B.C., was the son of a medical doctor Nicomachus and Phaestis. He studied uner Plato at Athens and taught there 367-347; spent three years at the court of a former pupil Hermeias in Asia Minor and married Pythias a relation of his; after some time at Mitylene, in 343-2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be a tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander, and had other pupils. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of 'Peripatetics'), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea and died there in 322. Nearly all the works he prepared for publication are lost, the priceless ones extant being lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). I Practical. Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Economics (on the good of the family); On virtues and Vices; II Logical. Categories; Analytics (Prior and Posterior): Interpretation; Refutations used by Sophists; Topica. III Physical. Twenty six works (some suspedt) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc. IV Metaphysics on being as being. V Art Rhetoric and Poetic. VI Other works including the Constitution of Athens; more works also doubtful authorship. VII Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics. -- Jacket
Memoirs of Socrates and the Symposium (The dinner party) by Xenophon( Book )
3 editions published in 1970 in English and Undetermined and held by 212 libraries worldwide
Posterior analytics by Aristotle( Book )
4 editions published between 1960 and 1989 in English and held by 209 libraries worldwide
"ARISTOTLE, great Greek Philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 B.C., was the son of a medical doctor Nicomachus and Phaestis. He studied uner Plato at Athens and taught there 367-347; spent three years at the court of a former pupil Hermeias in Asia Minor and married Pythias a relation of his; after some time at Mitylene, in 343-2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be a tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander, and had other pupils. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of 'Peripatetics'), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea and died there in 322. Nearly all the works he prepared for publication are lost, the priceless ones extant being lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). I Practical. Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Economics (on the good of the family); On virtues and Vices; II Logical. Categories; Analytics (Prior and Posterior): Interpretation; Refutations used by Sophists; Topica. III Physical. Twenty six works (some suspedt) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc. IV Metaphysics on being as being. V Art Rhetoric and Poetic. VI Other works including the Constitution of Athens; more works also doubtful authorship. VII Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics. -- Jacket
The metaphysics : books I-IX by Aristotle( Book )
43 editions published between 1933 and 2011 in 3 languages and held by 208 libraries worldwide
"Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BCE, was the son of Nicomachus, a physician, and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367-347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343-2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of Peripatetics), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea, where he died in 322. Nearly all the works Aristotle prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as follows: I Practical: Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Economics (on the good of the family); On Virtues and Vices. II Logical: Categories; Analytics (Prior and Posterior); Interpretation; Refutations used by Sophists; Topica. III Physical: Twenty-six works (some suspect) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc. IV Metaphysics: on being as being. V Art: Rhetoric and Poetics. VI Other works including the Constitution of Athens; more works also of doubtful authorship. VII Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics."--Jacket
The Metaphysics ... with an English translation by Hugh Tredennick by Aristotle( Book )
16 editions published between 1933 and 1961 in English and Greek, Ancient [to 1453] and held by 205 libraries worldwide
Metaphysics by Aristotle( Book )
25 editions published between 1935 and 2006 in 4 languages and held by 170 libraries worldwide
"Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BCE, was the son of Nicomachus, a physician, and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367-347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343-2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander. After Philip's death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of Peripatetics), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander's death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea, where he died in 322. Nearly all the works Aristotle prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as follows: I Practical: Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Economics (on the good of the family); On Virtues and Vices. II Logical: Categories; Analytics (Prior and Posterior); Interpretation; Refutations used by Sophists; Topica. III Physical: Twenty-six works (some suspect) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc. IV Metaphysics: on being as being. V Art: Rhetoric and Poetics. VI Other works including the Constitution of Athens; more works also of doubtful authorship. VII Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics."--Jacket
Posterior analytics : Topica by Aristotle( Book )
8 editions published in 1960 in English and Greek, Ancient [to 1453] and held by 55 libraries worldwide
Nearly all the works Aristotle (384-322 BCE) prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as practical; logical; physical; metaphysical; on art; other; fragments
Posterior analytics by Aristotle( Book )
14 editions published between 1960 and 1997 in 4 languages and held by 48 libraries worldwide
The categories of interpretation by Aristotle( Book )
3 editions published between 1967 and 1996 in English and held by 45 libraries worldwide
The categories ; On interpretation by Aristoteles( Book )
10 editions published between 1955 and 1983 in English and Greek, Ancient [to 1453] and held by 43 libraries worldwide
The categories on interpretation by Aristotle( Book )
7 editions published between 1949 and 2011 in English and Greek, Ancient [to 1453] and held by 31 libraries worldwide
The categories ; On interpretation, Prior analytics by Aristotle( Book )
3 editions published between 1938 and 1967 in English and held by 30 libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names
Hugh Tredennick born:1899 ied:1982 Tredennick, Hugh, 1899-1982
Tredennick, H.
Tredennick, Hugh, 1899-1982
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